↓ Skip to main content

Helping cancer patients quit smoking by increasing their risk perception: a study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, June 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Helping cancer patients quit smoking by increasing their risk perception: a study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Cancer, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1496-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

William H.C. Li, Sophia S.C. Chan, Kelvin M. P. Wang, T.H. Lam

Abstract

Despite smoking cessation can largely improve cancer prognosis and quality of life, many patients continued smoking after the diagnosis of cancer. This study aims to test the effectiveness of a smoking cessation intervention using risk communication approach to help cancer patients quit smoking, and to improve their health related quality of life. A cluster randomized controlled trial will be employed. Cancer patients who continued smoking after the diagnosis of cancer and have medical follow-up at the out-patient clinics of the five acute hospitals in Hong Kong will be invited to participate. Subjects in the experimental group will receive (1) health warnings of smoking based on a special designed leaflet; and (2) a patient-centred counseling from nurse counselors with emphasis on risk perceptions of smoking to cancer prognosis. Additionally, they will receive two more telephone counseling at 1-week and 1-month. Control group receive standard care and a generic self-help smoking cessation booklet. Outcomes measure include (a) self-reported and the biochemically validated quit rate, (b) patient's smoking reduction by at least 50 % compared to baseline, (c) quit attempt(s), (d) change in the intention to quit, (e) change in risk perceptions of smoking, and (f) change in health related quality of life. This study will make an important contribution to evidence-based practice by testing the effectiveness of a tailored smoking cessation intervention for cancer patients. The results will support the development of clinical practice guidelines to promote smoking cessation in cancer patients to improve their prognosis and quality of life. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01685723 . Registered 9 November 2012.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Unknown 71 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Researcher 8 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Lecturer 5 7%
Other 18 25%
Unknown 16 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 25%
Psychology 15 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 14%
Social Sciences 7 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 16 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2015.
All research outputs
#9,905,817
of 12,372,945 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#3,019
of 4,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,409
of 235,598 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,945 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,558 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,598 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.