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Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations: Hyperacute Stroke Care Guidelines, Update 2015

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Stroke, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
129 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
249 Mendeley
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Title
Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations: Hyperacute Stroke Care Guidelines, Update 2015
Published in
International Journal of Stroke, July 2015
DOI 10.1111/ijs.12551
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leanne K. Casaubon, Jean-Martin Boulanger, Dylan Blacquiere, Scott Boucher, Kyla Brown, Tom Goddard, Jacqueline Gordon, Myles Horton, Jeffrey Lalonde, Christian LaRivière, Pascale Lavoie, Paul Leslie, Jeanne McNeill, Bijoy K. Menon, Brian Moses, Melanie Penn, Jeff Perry, Elizabeth Snieder, Dawn Tymianski, Norine Foley, Eric E. Smith, Gord Gubitz, Michael D. Hill, Ev Glasser, Patrice Lindsay

Abstract

The 2015 update of the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations Hyperacute Stroke Care guideline highlights key elements involved in the initial assessment, stabilization, and treatment of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA), ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and acute venous sinus thrombosis. The most notable change in this 5th edition is the addition of new recommendations for the use of endovascular therapy for patients with acute ischemic stroke and proximal intracranial arterial occlusion. This includes an overview of the infrastructure and resources required for stroke centers that will provide endovascular therapy as well as regional structures needed to ensure that all patients with acute ischemic stroke that are eligible for endovascular therapy will be able to access this newly approved therapy; recommendations for hyperacute brain and enhanced vascular imaging using computed tomography angiography and computed tomography perfusion; patient selection criteria based on the five trials of endovascular therapy published in early 2015, and performance metric targets for important time-points involved in endovascular therapy, including computed tomography-to-groin puncture and computed tomography-to-reperfusion times. Other updates in this guideline include recommendations for improved time efficiencies for all aspects of hyperacute stroke care with a movement toward a new median target door-to-needle time of 30 min, with the 90th percentile being 60 min. A stronger emphasis is placed on increasing public awareness of stroke with the recent launch of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada FAST signs of stroke campaign; reinforcing the public need to seek immediate medical attention by calling 911; further engagement of paramedics in the prehospital phase with prehospital notification to the receiving emergency department, as well as the stroke team, including neuroradiology; updates to the triage and same-day assessment of patients with transient ischemic attack; updates to blood pressure recommendations for the hyperacute phase of care for ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The goal of these recommendations and supporting materials is to improve efficiencies and minimize the absolute time lapse between stroke symptom onset and reperfusion therapy, which in turn leads to better outcomes and potentially shorter recovery times.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 249 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 3 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 242 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 34 14%
Researcher 34 14%
Student > Bachelor 33 13%
Other 30 12%
Student > Postgraduate 24 10%
Other 66 27%
Unknown 28 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 121 49%
Nursing and Health Professions 32 13%
Neuroscience 16 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 2%
Other 32 13%
Unknown 36 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2018.
All research outputs
#1,232,587
of 14,332,499 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Stroke
#80
of 947 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,401
of 232,413 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Stroke
#3
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,332,499 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 947 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,413 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.