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Prevalence and predictors of alcohol use during pregnancy: findings from international multicentre cohort studies

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
31 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
75 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
87 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
160 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Prevalence and predictors of alcohol use during pregnancy: findings from international multicentre cohort studies
Published in
BMJ Open, July 2015
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006323
Pubmed ID
Authors

Linda M O'Keeffe, Patricia M Kearney, Fergus P McCarthy, Ali S Khashan, Richard A Greene, Robyn A North, Lucilla Poston, Lesley M E McCowan, Philip N Baker, Gus A Dekker, James J Walker, Rennae Taylor, Louise C Kenny

Abstract

To compare the prevalence and predictors of alcohol use in multiple cohorts. Cross-cohort comparison of retrospective and prospective studies. Population-based studies in Ireland, the UK, Australia and New Zealand. 17 244 women of predominantly Caucasian origin from two Irish retrospective studies (Growing up in Ireland (GUI) and Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System Ireland (PRAMS Ireland)), and one multicentre prospective international cohort, Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study. Prevalence of alcohol use pre-pregnancy and during pregnancy across cohorts. Sociodemographic factors associated with alcohol consumption in each cohort. Alcohol consumption during pregnancy in Ireland ranged from 20% in GUI to 80% in SCOPE, and from 40% to 80% in Australia, New Zealand and the UK. Levels of exposure also varied substantially among drinkers in each cohort ranging from 70% consuming more than 1-2 units/week in the first trimester in SCOPE Ireland, to 46% and 15% in the retrospective studies. Smoking during pregnancy was the most consistent predictor of gestational alcohol use in all three cohorts, and smokers were 17% more likely to drink during pregnancy in SCOPE, relative risk (RR)=1.17 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.22), 50% more likely to drink during pregnancy in GUI, RR=1.50 (95% CI 1.36 to 1.65), and 42% more likely to drink in PRAMS, RR=1.42 (95% CI 1.18 to 1.70). Our data suggest that alcohol use during pregnancy is prevalent and socially pervasive in the UK, Ireland, New Zealand and Australia. New policy and interventions are required to reduce alcohol prevalence both prior to and during pregnancy. Further research on biological markers and conventions for measuring alcohol use in pregnancy is required to improve the validity and reliability of prevalence estimates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 75 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 160 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
New Zealand 2 1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 157 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 16%
Student > Bachelor 19 12%
Researcher 19 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 6%
Other 31 19%
Unknown 31 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 15%
Social Sciences 13 8%
Psychology 10 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 6%
Other 24 15%
Unknown 33 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 343. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2019.
All research outputs
#59,707
of 19,524,015 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#126
of 18,402 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#749
of 241,760 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#1
of 281 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,524,015 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 18,402 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,760 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 281 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.