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The impact of attitudes as a mediator between sense of autonomy and help-seeking intentions for self-injury

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of attitudes as a mediator between sense of autonomy and help-seeking intentions for self-injury
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13034-015-0058-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Megan Pumpa, Graham Martin

Abstract

Self-injury is a complex issue, further complicated by the fact that up to half of young people who self-injure do not receive help. Young people who do receive help for self-injury claim they prefer to access family and friends over more formal sources of help. This original research set out to examine the influence of negative attitudes to professional help and a sense of autonomy on help-seeking intentions. A cross-section of 220 university students and young adults from the community (Students = 131, other participants = 89; mean age = 24.64) completed anonymous online questionnaires measuring self-injurious behaviour and mental health related problems, attitudes toward seeking professional mental health help, autonomy, and intentions to seek help for self-injury. Two separate mediation models were tested using a bootstrapping approach to investigate intentions to seek help - one on mental health problems, and one specifically on self-injury. More positive attitudes to help-seeking were significantly associated with greater intentions to seek help, while higher perceived autonomy was associated with lower intentions to seek help. Attitudes fully mediated the negative relationship between autonomy and willingness to seek help for self-injury. The model also maintained partial mediation for willingness to seek help for other mental health problems, beyond self-injury. Current self-injurers expressed significantly more negative attitudes toward help-seeking compared to past self-injurers and those with no history of self-injury. Similarly, current self-injurers reported being less likely to seek help from anyone compared to both other groups. This study appears to be the first to set out to compare self-injurers' attitudes to help-seeking directly with those of non-self-injurers, and the first to show that attitudes mediate the relationship between autonomy and help-seeking. The findings provide evidence that will assist development of interventions targeting negative attitudes toward seeking professional help, in order to increase help-seeking among self-injurers who would otherwise not receive treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 67 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Researcher 8 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 12%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 10 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 36 53%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 12%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 3%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Arts and Humanities 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 16 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 November 2017.
All research outputs
#7,374,500
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#222
of 460 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,362
of 232,543 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 460 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,543 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.