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Early Detection of Preterm Intraventricular Hemorrhage From Clinical Electroencephalography

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care Medicine, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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29 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Early Detection of Preterm Intraventricular Hemorrhage From Clinical Electroencephalography
Published in
Critical Care Medicine, July 2015
DOI 10.1097/ccm.0000000000001190
Pubmed ID
Authors

Iyer, Kartik K, Roberts, James A, Hellström-Westas, Lena, Wikström, Sverre, Hansen Pupp, Ingrid, Ley, David, Breakspear, Michael, Vanhatalo, Sampsa, Kartik K. Iyer, James A. Roberts, Lena Hellström-Westas, Sverre Wikström, Ingrid Hansen Pupp, David Ley, Michael Breakspear, Sampsa Vanhatalo

Abstract

Intraventricular hemorrhage is a common neurologic complication of extremely preterm birth and leads to lifelong neurodevelopmental disabilities. Early bedside detection of intraventricular hemorrhage is crucial to enabling timely interventions. We sought to detect early markers of brain activity that preempt the occurrence of intraventricular hemorrhage in extremely preterm infants during the first postnatal days. Cross-sectional study. Level III neonatal ICU. Twenty-five extremely preterm infants (22-28 wk gestational age). We quantitatively assessed electroencephalography in the first 72 hours of postnatal life, focusing on the electrical burst activity of the preterm. Cranial ultrasound was performed on day 1 (0-24 hr) and day 3 (48-72 hr). Outcomes were categorized into three classes: 1) no intraventricular hemorrhage (grade 0); 2) mild-moderate intraventricular hemorrhage (grades 1-2, i.e., germinal matrix hemorrhages or intraventricular hemorrhage without ventricular dilatation, respectively); and 3) severe intraventricular hemorrhage (grades 3-4, i.e., intraventricular hemorrhage with ventricular dilatation or intraparenchymal involvement). Quantitative assessment of electroencephalography burst shapes was used to preempt the occurrence and severity of intraventricular hemorrhage as detected by ultrasound. The shapes of electroencephalography bursts found in the intraventricular hemorrhage infants were significantly sharper (F = 13.78; p < 0.0001) and less symmetric (F = 6.91; p < 0.015) than in preterm infants without intraventricular hemorrhage. Diagnostic discrimination of intraventricular hemorrhage infants using measures of burst symmetry and sharpness yielded high true-positive rates (82% and 88%, respectively) and low false-positive rates (19% and 8%). Conventional electroencephalography measures of interburst intervals and burst counts were not significantly associated with intraventricular hemorrhage. Detection of intraventricular hemorrhage during the first postnatal days is possible from bedside measures of brain activity prior to ultrasound confirmation of intraventricular hemorrhage. Significantly, our novel automated assessment of electroencephalography preempts the occurrence of intraventricular hemorrhage in the extremely preterm. Early bedside detection of intraventricular hemorrhage holds promise for advancing individual care, targeted therapeutic trials, and understanding mechanisms of brain injury in neonates.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Finland 1 3%
Unknown 27 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 31%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Student > Master 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Other 8 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 52%
Unspecified 4 14%
Engineering 3 10%
Neuroscience 2 7%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 4 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2015.
All research outputs
#2,715,914
of 11,474,867 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care Medicine
#2,242
of 6,247 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#58,212
of 232,850 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care Medicine
#65
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,474,867 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,247 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,850 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.