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A comparison of offending trajectories in violent youth according to violence type

Overview of attention for article published in Criminal Behaviour & Mental Health, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
A comparison of offending trajectories in violent youth according to violence type
Published in
Criminal Behaviour & Mental Health, July 2015
DOI 10.1002/cbm.1969
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hannah Ching, Michael Daffern, Stuart Thomas

Abstract

Widespread public concern about youth violence persists, particularly the so-called acts of appetitive violence characterised by positive affect and exemplified in modern trends such as 'happy slapping'. Empirical research into this phenomenon is scant. The aim of this study was to determine whether perpetration of appetitive violence signals a specific offending trajectory. We reviewed reports and related material from 105 violent young offenders referred to court mental health services in the state of Victoria, Australia. Index violent offences were categorised as appetitive or not. Official police records were used to determine rearrest during the 12 months following mental health assessment. The nine young people whose offence was classified as appetitive were male and did not reoffend, generally or violently, at different rates than the other youths. The offending trajectories of young people with appetitively violent index offences were indistinguishable from other violent youths. There is thus insufficient information here to recommend distinctive intervention for this subgroup, but their high reoffending rate (7/9) suggests that they are worthy of more research attention. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 5 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Master 3 10%
Researcher 3 10%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 42%
Social Sciences 7 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Materials Science 1 3%
Unknown 8 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 March 2017.
All research outputs
#8,185,656
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Criminal Behaviour & Mental Health
#238
of 420 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,097
of 232,204 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Criminal Behaviour & Mental Health
#5
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 420 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,204 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.