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Discursive constructions of professional identity in policy and regulatory discourse

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Advanced Nursing, July 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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12 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Discursive constructions of professional identity in policy and regulatory discourse
Published in
Journal of Advanced Nursing, July 2018
DOI 10.1111/jan.13723
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gerard Fealy, Josephine-Mary Hegarty, Martin McNamara, Mary Casey, Denise O'Leary, Catriona Kennedy, Pauline O'Reilly, Rhona O'Connell, Anne-Marie Brady, Emma Nicholson

Abstract

To examine and describe disciplinary discourses conducted through professional policy and regulatory documents in nursing and midwifery in Ireland. A key tenet of discourse theory is that group identities are constructed in public discourses and these discursively-constructed identities become social realities. Professional identities can be extracted from both the explicit and latent content of discourse. Studies of nursing's disciplinary discourse have drawn attention to a dominant discourse that confers nursing with particular identities, which privilege the relational and affective aspects of nursing and in the process, marginalise scientific knowledge and the technical and body work of nursing. We used critical discourse analysis to analyse a purposive sample of nursing and midwifery regulatory and policy documents. We applied a four-part, sequential approach to analysing the selected texts. This involved identifying key words, phrases and statements that indicated dominant discourses that, in turn, revealed latent beliefs and assumptions. The focus of our analysis was on how the discourses construct professional identities. Our analysis indicated recurring narratives that appeared to confer nurses and midwives with three dominant identities: 'the knowledgeable practitioner', the 'interpersonal practitioner' and the 'accountable practitioner'. The discourse also carried assumptions about the form and content of disciplinary knowledge. Academic study of identity construction in discourse is important to disciplinary development by raising nurses' and midwives' consciousness, alerting them to the ways that their own discourse can shape their identities, influence public and political opinion and, in the process, shape public policy on their professions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 19%
Lecturer 5 14%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 2 5%
Other 10 27%
Unknown 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 18 49%
Social Sciences 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Linguistics 2 5%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 6 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 August 2018.
All research outputs
#4,110,682
of 21,440,657 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Advanced Nursing
#1,737
of 4,865 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,092
of 300,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Advanced Nursing
#61
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,440,657 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,865 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,073 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.