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Validation and Assessment of a Technology Familiarity Score in Patients Attending a Symptomatic Breast Clinic

Overview of attention for article published in World Journal of Surgery, July 2015
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Title
Validation and Assessment of a Technology Familiarity Score in Patients Attending a Symptomatic Breast Clinic
Published in
World Journal of Surgery, July 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00268-015-3134-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. O’Brien, J. Kelly, E. A. Lehane, V. Livingstone, B. Cotter, A. Butt, L. Kelly, M. A. Corrigan

Abstract

New media technologies (computers, mobile phones and the internet) have the potential to transform the healthcare information needs of patients with breast disease (Ferlay et al. in Eur J Cancer 49:1374-1403, 2013). However, patients' current level of use and their willingness to accept new media for education and communication remain unknown. This was a single-centre clinic-based prospective cross-sectional study. A previously developed instrument was modified, validated and tested on patients attending a symptomatic breast clinic. The instrument was evaluated on 200 symptomatic breast patients. The commonest outlets for education were staff (95 %), leaflets (69 %) and websites (59 %). Websites are more likely to be consulted by younger patients (<47 years), and patients who were working, students or homemakers (p < 0.05). Patients rated usefulness of information media in this order: (1) print, (2) phone, (3) website, (4) email, (5) text and (6) apps. Patients who were new to the clinic were more likely to find text messaging and emailing useful (n < 0.05). Younger patients (<47 years) are more likely to find text messages, apps, websites and email useful (p < 0.05). Urban patients are more likely to find websites and email useful (p < 0.05). Patients with higher education were more likely to favour apps, websites and email (p < 0.05). Smartphone owners were significantly more likely to rate text messaging, apps, websites and email as useful media (p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that new media technology use among breast patients is expanding as expected along generational trends. As such its' further integration into healthcare systems can potentially ameliorate patient education and communication.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 2%
Unknown 42 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 19%
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Master 6 14%
Other 3 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 8 19%
Unknown 8 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 21%
Psychology 7 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 12%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Computer Science 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 11 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2015.
All research outputs
#10,833,148
of 12,220,306 outputs
Outputs from World Journal of Surgery
#2,005
of 2,374 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,362
of 215,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Journal of Surgery
#62
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,220,306 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,374 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 215,189 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.