↓ Skip to main content

Prospective evaluation of RASSF1A cell-free DNA as a biomarker of pre-eclampsia

Overview of attention for article published in Placenta, September 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Prospective evaluation of RASSF1A cell-free DNA as a biomarker of pre-eclampsia
Published in
Placenta, September 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.placenta.2015.07.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesca Salvianti, Annalisa Inversetti, Maddalena Smid, Luca Valsecchi, Massimo Candiani, Mario Pazzagli, Laura Cremonesi, Maurizio Ferrari, Pamela Pinzani, Silvia Galbiati

Abstract

This study aims to quantify total and fetal cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in maternal plasma at different gestational ages and to assess whether this could represent a reliable predictive marker of pre-eclampsia (PE) before clinical onset. We performed a qPCR assay to compare the cfDNA concentration of hypermethylated and unmethylated RASSF1A promoter gene sequences in maternal plasma among 3 groups of pregnant women. These included 17 women with overt PE, 33 women at risk for the disease subsequently differentiated into 9 who developed PE and 24 who did not, and 73 controls. All women at risk were consecutively sampled throughout the whole gestation. Both total and fetal cfDNA had a good diagnostic performance in distinguishing patients with overt PE from healthy controls. When comparing women at risk who developed PE to women at risk who did not, the predictive capability was satisfactory at a gestational age ranging from 17 to 30 weeks. This allowed establishing within this time interval a cut-off value of 735 GE/ml for total cfDNA (87.5% sensitivity and 70.0% specificity), and a cut-off value of 7.49 GE/ml for fetal cfDNA (100% sensitivity and 50% specificity). cfDNA levels turned positive several weeks before the onset of the disease: from 2 to 18 weeks for total cfDNA and from 8 to 17 weeks for fetal cfDNA. The simultaneous use of total and fetal cfDNA would allow an accurate monitoring and prevention of PE development thus suggesting that RASSF1A could represent a potential biomarker of PE.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 3%
Mexico 1 3%
Egypt 1 3%
Ireland 1 3%
Unknown 25 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 28%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 14%
Professor 3 10%
Student > Master 2 7%
Other 7 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 24%
Unspecified 5 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2015.
All research outputs
#9,866,200
of 12,357,851 outputs
Outputs from Placenta
#738
of 1,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,165
of 242,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Placenta
#35
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,357,851 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,293 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,485 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.