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Mortality in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

Overview of attention for article published in New England Journal of Medicine, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 25,602)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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Readers on

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325 Mendeley
Title
Mortality in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria
Published in
New England Journal of Medicine, July 2018
DOI 10.1056/nejmsa1803972
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nishant Kishore, Domingo Marqués, Ayesha Mahmud, Mathew V. Kiang, Irmary Rodriguez, Arlan Fuller, Peggy Ebner, Cecilia Sorensen, Fabio Racy, Jay Lemery, Leslie Maas, Jennifer Leaning, Rafael A. Irizarry, Satchit Balsari, Caroline O. Buckee

Abstract

Background Quantifying the effect of natural disasters on society is critical for recovery of public health services and infrastructure. The death toll can be difficult to assess in the aftermath of a major disaster. In September 2017, Hurricane Maria caused massive infrastructural damage to Puerto Rico, but its effect on mortality remains contentious. The official death count is 64. Methods Using a representative, stratified sample, we surveyed 3299 randomly chosen households across Puerto Rico to produce an independent estimate of all-cause mortality after the hurricane. Respondents were asked about displacement, infrastructure loss, and causes of death. We calculated excess deaths by comparing our estimated post-hurricane mortality rate with official rates for the same period in 2016. Results From the survey data, we estimated a mortality rate of 14.3 deaths (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.8 to 18.9) per 1000 persons from September 20 through December 31, 2017. This rate yielded a total of 4645 excess deaths during this period (95% CI, 793 to 8498), equivalent to a 62% increase in the mortality rate as compared with the same period in 2016. However, this number is likely to be an underestimate because of survivor bias. The mortality rate remained high through the end of December 2017, and one third of the deaths were attributed to delayed or interrupted health care. Hurricane-related migration was substantial. Conclusions This household-based survey suggests that the number of excess deaths related to Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico is more than 70 times the official estimate. (Funded by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and others.).

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 325 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 325 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 70 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 48 15%
Unspecified 43 13%
Researcher 43 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 35 11%
Other 86 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 60 18%
Social Sciences 51 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 10%
Environmental Science 28 9%
Engineering 25 8%
Other 128 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10486. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2019.
All research outputs
#5
of 13,534,610 outputs
Outputs from New England Journal of Medicine
#1
of 25,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2
of 270,383 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New England Journal of Medicine
#1
of 263 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,534,610 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 25,602 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 63.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,383 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 263 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.