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Hamster Weight Patterns Predict the Intensity and Course of Schistosoma haematobium Infection

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Parasitology, July 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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8 Mendeley
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Title
Hamster Weight Patterns Predict the Intensity and Course of Schistosoma haematobium Infection
Published in
Journal of Parasitology, July 2015
DOI 10.1645/14-600
Pubmed ID
Authors

Le, Thien-Linh, Boyett, Deborah M, Hurley-Novatny, Amelia, Hsieh, Michael H

Abstract

Although Syrian golden hamsters are a widely used host for experimental infection by Schistosoma haematobium, surprisingly little is known about the course of infection and associated intensity (as defined by measures of parasite burden). As such, we sought to define inexpensive, simple, noninvasive, and accurate methods for assessing and predicting the severity of disease in S. haematobium infected hamsters in order to prevent premature hamster sacrifice and unexpected morbidity and mortality. Through monitoring the weight and behavior of infected hamsters, we determined that the weight loss patterns of infected hamsters are highly correlated with commonly used measures of the severity of infection (i.e., numbers of eggs passed in the stool, worm burdens, and total egg yields). In contrast, we found no significant correlation between hamster weight loss patterns and egg yields from liver and intestinal tissues. Our findings suggest that a more complex relationship exists among worm burden, fecundity, and egg passage in the feces than previously appreciated. Regardless, our data may be useful for workers seeking to optimize harvests of S. haematobium eggs and worms from infected hamsters for downstream applications.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 25%
Student > Postgraduate 1 13%
Student > Master 1 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 13%
Other 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 2 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 13%
Unspecified 1 13%
Other 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2016.
All research outputs
#2,812,402
of 11,271,704 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Parasitology
#237
of 1,691 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,427
of 236,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Parasitology
#4
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,271,704 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,691 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,684 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.