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Maternal prenatal and/or postnatal n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) supplementation for preventing allergies in early childhood

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
62 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
177 Mendeley
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Title
Maternal prenatal and/or postnatal n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) supplementation for preventing allergies in early childhood
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, July 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd010085.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anoja W Gunaratne, Maria Makrides, Carmel T Collins

Abstract

Allergies have become more prevalent globally over the last 20 years. Dietary consumption of n-3 (or omega 3) long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) has declined over the same period of time. This, together with the known role of n-3 LCPUFA in inhibiting inflammation, has resulted in speculation that n-3 LCPUFA may prevent allergy development. Dietary n-3 fatty acids supplements may change the developing immune system of the newborn before allergic responses are established, particularly for those with a genetic predisposition to the production of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody. Individuals with IgE-mediated allergies have both the signs and symptoms of the allergic disease and a positive skin prick test (SPT) to the allergen. To assess the effect of n-3 LCPUFA supplementation in pregnant and/or breastfeeding women on allergy outcomes (food allergy, atopic dermatitis (eczema), allergic rhinitis (hay fever) and asthma/wheeze) in their children. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (6 August 2014), PubMed (1966 to 01 August 2014), CINAHL via EBSCOhost (1984 to 01 August 2014), Scopus (1995 to 01 August 2014), Web of Knowledge (1864 to 01 August 2014) and ClinicalTrials.gov (01 August 2014) and reference lists of retrieved studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of n-3 LCPUFA supplementation of pregnant and/or lactating women (compared with placebo or no treatment) on allergy outcomes of the infants or children. Trials using a cross-over design and trials examining biochemical outcomes only were not eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently assessed eligibility and trial quality and performed data extraction. Where the review authors were also investigators on trials selected, an independent reviewer assessed trial quality and performed data extraction. Eight trials involving 3366 women and their 3175 children were included in the review. In these trials, women were supplemented with n-3 LCPUFA during pregnancy (five trials), lactation (two trials) or both pregnancy and lactation (one trial). All trials randomly allocated women to either a n-3 LCPUFA supplement or a control group. The risk of bias varied across the eight included trials in this review with only two trials with a low risk of selection, performance and attrition bias.N-3 LCPUFA supplementation showed a clear reduction in the primary outcome of any allergy (medically diagnosed IgE mediated) in children aged 12 to 36 months (risk ratio (RR) 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44 to 0.98; two RCTs; 823 children), but not beyond 36 months (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.61 to 1.20; one RCT, 706 children). For any allergy (medically diagnosed IgE mediated and/or parental report), no clear differences were seen in children either at 12 to 36 months (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.11; two RCTs, 823 children) or beyond 36 months of age (RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.09; three RCTs, 1765 children).For the secondary outcomes of specific allergies there were no clear differences for food allergies at 12 to 36 months and beyond 36 months, but a clear reduction was seen for children in their first 12 months with n-3 LCPUFA (both for medically diagnosed IgE mediated and medically diagnosed IgE mediated and/or parental report). There was a clear reduction in medically diagnosed IgE-mediated eczema with n-3 LCPUFA for children 12 to 36 months of age, but not at any other time point for both medically diagnosed IgE mediated and medically diagnosed IgE mediated and/or parental report. No clear differences for allergic rhinitis or asthma/wheeze were seen at any time point for both medically diagnosed IgE mediated, and medically diagnosed IgE mediated and/or parental report.There was a clear reduction in children's sensitisation to egg and sensitisation to any allergen between 12 to 36 months of age when mothers were supplemented with n-3 LCPUFA.In terms of safety for the mother and child, n-3 LCPUFA supplementation during pregnancy did not show increased risk of postpartum haemorrhage or early childhood infections. Overall, there is limited evidence to support maternal n-3 LCPUFA supplementation during pregnancy and/or lactation for reducing allergic disease in children. Few differences in childhood allergic disease were seen between women who were supplemented with n-3 LCPUFA and those who were not.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 177 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 2 1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Ethiopia 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 171 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 36 20%
Researcher 32 18%
Student > Master 31 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 10%
Unspecified 14 8%
Other 46 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 78 44%
Nursing and Health Professions 27 15%
Unspecified 19 11%
Psychology 10 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 5%
Other 34 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 44. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2018.
All research outputs
#341,794
of 12,527,219 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#1,024
of 8,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,651
of 235,350 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#28
of 246 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,527,219 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,923 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,350 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 246 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.