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Desert grassland responses to climate and soil moisture suggest divergent vulnerabilities across the southwestern United States

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, September 2015
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1 tweeter

Citations

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52 Dimensions

Readers on

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137 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Desert grassland responses to climate and soil moisture suggest divergent vulnerabilities across the southwestern United States
Published in
Global Change Biology, September 2015
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13043
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer R. Gremer, John B. Bradford, Seth M. Munson, Michael C. Duniway

Abstract

Climate change predictions include warming and drying trends, which are expected to be particularly pronounced in the southwestern United States. In this region, grassland dynamics are tightly linked to available moisture, yet it has proven difficult to resolve what aspects of climate drive vegetation change. In part, this is because it is unclear how heterogeneity in soils affects plant responses to climate. Here, we combine climate and soil properties with a mechanistic soil water model to explain temporal fluctuations in perennial grass cover, quantify where and the degree to which incorporating soil water dynamics enhances our ability to understand temporal patterns, and explore the potential consequences of climate change by assessing future trajectories of important climate and soil water variables. Our analyses focused on long-term (20 to 56 years) perennial grass dynamics across the Colorado Plateau, Sonoran, and Chihuahuan Desert regions. Our results suggest that climate variability has negative effects on grass cover, and that precipitation subsidies that extend growing seasons are beneficial. Soil water metrics, including the number of dry days and availability of water from deeper (>30 cm) soil layers, explained additional grass cover variability. While individual climate variables were ranked as more important in explaining grass cover, collectively soil water accounted for 40 to 60% of the total explained variance. Soil water conditions were more useful for understanding the responses of C3 than C4 grass species. Projections of water balance variables under climate change indicate that conditions that currently support perennial grasses will be less common in the future, and these altered conditions will be more pronounced in the Chihuahuan Desert and Colorado Plateau. We conclude that incorporating multiple aspects of climate and accounting for soil variability can improve our ability to understand patterns, identify areas of vulnerability, and predict the future of desert grasslands. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 137 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 4%
Mexico 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 129 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 36 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 21%
Student > Master 24 18%
Professor 8 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 5%
Other 19 14%
Unknown 14 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 35%
Environmental Science 47 34%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 9%
Social Sciences 2 1%
Computer Science 1 <1%
Other 2 1%
Unknown 25 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2015.
All research outputs
#15,828,487
of 17,911,762 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#4,697
of 4,777 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,088
of 242,299 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#88
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,911,762 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,777 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,299 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.