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Dynamics of corticospinal motor control during overground and treadmill walking in humans

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurophysiology, September 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

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77 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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14 Dimensions

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73 Mendeley
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Title
Dynamics of corticospinal motor control during overground and treadmill walking in humans
Published in
Journal of Neurophysiology, September 2018
DOI 10.1152/jn.00613.2017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luisa Roeder, Tjeerd W. Boonstra, Simon S. Smith, Graham K. Kerr

Abstract

Increasing evidence suggests cortical involvement in the control of human gait. However, the nature of corticospinal interactions remains poorly understood. We performed time-frequency analysis of electrophysiological activity acquired during treadmill and overground walking in 22 healthy, young adults. Participants walked at their preferred speed (4.2, SD 0.4 km h-1), which was matched across both gait conditions. Event-related power, corticomuscular coherence (CMC) and inter-trial coherence (ITC) were assessed for EEG from bilateral sensorimotor cortices and EMG from the bilateral tibialis anterior (TA) muscles. Cortical power, CMC and ITC at theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequencies (4-45 Hz) increased during the double support phase of the gait cycle for both overground and treadmill walking. High beta (21-30 Hz) CMC and ITC of EMG was significantly increased during overground compared to treadmill walking, as well as EEG power in theta band (4-7 Hz). The phase spectra revealed positive time lags at alpha, beta and gamma frequencies, indicating that the EEG response preceded the EMG response. The parallel increases in power, CMC and ITC during double support suggest evoked responses at spinal and cortical populations rather than a modulation of ongoing corticospinal oscillatory interactions. The evoked responses are not consistent with the idea of synchronization of ongoing corticospinal oscillations, but instead suggest coordinated cortical and spinal inputs during the double support phase. Frequency-band dependent differences in power, CMC and ITC between overground and treadmill walking suggest differing neural control for the two gait modalities, emphasizing the task-dependent nature of neural processes during human walking.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 77 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 73 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 22%
Student > Master 13 18%
Researcher 8 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 14 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 20 27%
Engineering 9 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 11%
Sports and Recreations 6 8%
Psychology 3 4%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 19 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2019.
All research outputs
#491,528
of 16,025,857 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurophysiology
#56
of 6,049 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,182
of 282,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurophysiology
#3
of 103 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,025,857 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,049 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,414 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 103 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.