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Altered blood oxygen level-dependent signal variability in chronic post-traumatic stress disorder during symptom provocation

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, July 2015
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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Altered blood oxygen level-dependent signal variability in chronic post-traumatic stress disorder during symptom provocation
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, July 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s87332
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jun Ke, Li Zhang, Rongfeng Qi, Qiang Xu, Weihui Li, Cailan Hou, Yuan Zhong, Zhiqiang Zhang, Zhong He, Lingjiang Li, Guangming Lu

Abstract

Recent research suggests that variability in brain signal provides important information about brain function in health and disease. However, it is unknown whether blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal variability is altered in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We aimed to identify the BOLD signal variability changes of PTSD patients during symptom provocation and compare the brain patterns of BOLD signal variability with those of brain activation. Twelve PTSD patients and 14 age-matched controls, who all experienced a mining accident, underwent clinical assessment as well as fMRI scanning while viewing trauma-related and neutral pictures. BOLD signal variability and brain activation were respectively examined with standard deviation (SD) and general linear model analysis, and compared between the PTSD and control groups. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to explore the association between PTSD symptom severity and these two brain measures across all subjects as well as in the PTSD group. PTSD patients showed increased activation in the middle occipital gyrus compared with controls, and an inverse correlation was found between PTSD symptom severity and brain activation in the hippocampus and anterior cingulate cortex/medial prefrontal cortex. Brain variability analysis revealed increased SD in the insula, anterior cingulate cortex/medial prefrontal cortex, and vermis, and decreased SD in the parahippocapal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, somatosensory cortex, and striatum. Importantly, SD alterations in several regions were found in both traumatic and neutral conditions and were stratified by PTSD symptom severity. BOLD signal variability may be a reliable and sensitive biomarker of PTSD, and combining brain activation and brain variability analysis may provide complementary insight into the neural basis of this disorder.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Switzerland 1 3%
Unknown 38 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Student > Master 3 8%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 11 28%
Neuroscience 9 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 20%
Unknown 12 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2015.
All research outputs
#14,231,810
of 22,817,213 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,471
of 2,985 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,464
of 263,426 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#49
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,817,213 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,985 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.