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The everyday use of assistive technology by people with dementia and their family carers: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Geriatrics, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
53 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
72 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
215 Mendeley
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Title
The everyday use of assistive technology by people with dementia and their family carers: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Geriatrics, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12877-015-0091-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Grant Gibson, Claire Dickinson, Katie Brittain, Louise Robinson

Abstract

Assistive Technology (AT) has been suggested as a means by which people with dementia can be helped to live independently, while also leading to greater efficiencies in care. However little is known about how AT is being used by people with dementia and their carers in their daily routines. This paper reports on a qualitative study exploring the everyday use of AT by people with dementia and their families. The research employed a qualitative methodology. Semi structured interviews took place with 39 participants, 13 people with dementia and 26 carers. Key themes were identified using thematic analysis and the constant comparative method. Three categories of AT use in everyday settings were identified; formal AT, accessed via social care services, 'off the shelf AT' purchased privately, and 'do it yourself' AT, everyday household products adapted by families to fulfil individual need in the absence of specific devices. Access to AT was driven by carers, with the majority of benefits being experienced by carers. Barriers to use included perceptions about AT cost; dilemmas about the best time to use AT; and a lack of information and support from formal health and social care services about how to access AT, where to source it and when and how it can be used. It has been argued that the 'mixed economy' landscape, with private AT provision supplementing state provision of AT, is a key feature for the mainstreaming of AT services. Our data suggests that such a mixed economy is indeed taking place, with more participants using 'off the shelf' and 'DIY' AT purchased privately rather than via health and social care services. However this system has largely arisen due to an inability of formal care services to meet client needs. Such findings therefore raise questions about just who AT in its current provision is working for and whether a mixed market approach is the most appropriate provider model. Everyday technologies play an important role in supporting families with dementia to continue caring; further research is needed however to determine the most effective and person-centred models for future AT provision.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 53 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 215 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 1%
Norway 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 206 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 40 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 16%
Student > Bachelor 30 14%
Student > Master 27 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 7%
Other 46 21%
Unknown 21 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 37 17%
Social Sciences 31 14%
Psychology 17 8%
Computer Science 16 7%
Other 41 19%
Unknown 35 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 April 2017.
All research outputs
#527,270
of 15,918,909 outputs
Outputs from BMC Geriatrics
#56
of 1,776 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,494
of 236,583 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Geriatrics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,918,909 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,776 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,583 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them