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Human rights in patient care: drug treatment and punishment in Russia

Overview of attention for article published in Public Health Reviews, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 141)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
8 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
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Title
Human rights in patient care: drug treatment and punishment in Russia
Published in
Public Health Reviews, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40985-018-0088-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mikhail Golichenko, Sandra Ka Hon Chu

Abstract

An inherent feature of drug control in many countries has been an excessive emphasis on punitive measures at the expense of public health. At its most extreme, this approach has reduced health services for people who use drugs to an extension of the drug control system. In these environments, health services are punitive rather than supportive for people who use drugs, especially those who are drug dependent. In Russia, the government's official policy towards drug use is one of "social intolerance," which seeks to legitimize and encourage societal ill treatment of people who use drugs. In practice, this policy has materialized as widespread and systematic human rights violations of people who use drugs, including by subjecting them to unscientific and ideologically driven methods of drug prevention and treatment and denying them access to essential medicines and services. While such human rights violations are well-documented, there have been no attempts to date to consider the consequences of this approach through the lens of human rights in patient care. This concept brings together the rights of both patients and providers and interrogates the role of the state on the relationship between two core groups: drug-dependent people and drug treatment doctors or "narcologists" in Russia. In this article, we apply the concept of human rights in patient care to consider the narcologist's role in punitive drug policy and human rights violations against people who use drugs and to analyze how punitive drug policy manifests as human rights violations against narcologists themselves, who lose their professional independence and their ability to work according to professional standards and ethical norms. We conclude that both people who use drugs and narcologists suffer from punitive drug policy and should unite their efforts to ensure drug policy does not undermine patients' health and human rights.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 31%
Student > Bachelor 3 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 15%
Researcher 2 15%
Unspecified 2 15%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 38%
Unspecified 2 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Environmental Science 1 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Other 3 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2019.
All research outputs
#969,497
of 13,568,727 outputs
Outputs from Public Health Reviews
#21
of 141 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,684
of 270,627 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Public Health Reviews
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,568,727 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 141 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,627 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them