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Projected carbon stocks in the conterminous USA with land use and variable fire regimes

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

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53 Mendeley
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Title
Projected carbon stocks in the conterminous USA with land use and variable fire regimes
Published in
Global Change Biology, October 2015
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13048
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dominique Bachelet, Ken Ferschweiler, Timothy J. Sheehan, Benjamin M. Sleeter, Zhiliang Zhu

Abstract

The dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) MC2 was run over the conterminous US at 30arc sec (~800m) to simulate the impacts of nine climate futures generated by 3GCMs (CSIRO, MIROC and CGCM3) using 3 emission scenarios (A2, A1B, B1) in the context of the LandCarbon national carbon sequestration assessment. It first simulated potential vegetation dynamics from coast to coast assuming no human impacts and naturally occurring wildfires. A moderate effect of increased atmospheric CO2 on water use efficiency and growth enhanced carbon sequestration but did not greatly influence woody encroachment. The wildfires maintained prairie-forest ecotones in the Great Plains. With simulated fire suppression, the number and impacts of wildfires was reduced since only catastrophic fires were allowed to escape. This greatly increased the expansion of forests and woodlands across the western US and some of the ecotones disappeared. However, when fires did occur their impacts (both extent and biomass consumed) were very large. We also evaluated the relative influence of human land use including forest and crop harvest by running the DGVM with land use (and fire suppression) and simple land management rules. From 2041 through 2060, carbon stocks (live biomass, soil and dead biomass) of US terrestrial ecosystems varied between 155 and 162 Pg C across the three emission scenarios when potential natural vegetation was simulated. With land use, periodic harvest of croplands and timberlands as well as the prevention of woody expansion across the West reduced carbon stocks to a range of 122-126 Pg C while effective fire suppression reduced fire emissions by about 50%. Despite the simplicity of our approach, the differences between the size of the carbon stocks confirm other reports of the importance of land use on the carbon cycle over climate change. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 6%
Mexico 1 2%
South Africa 1 2%
Unknown 48 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 21%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Master 5 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 8%
Other 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 26 49%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 21%
Unspecified 6 11%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 11%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Other 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2015.
All research outputs
#6,672,169
of 12,353,915 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#2,671
of 3,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#95,256
of 242,029 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#112
of 144 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,353,915 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.2. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,029 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 144 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.