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New Business Models to Accelerate Innovation in Pediatric Oncology Therapeutics

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Oncology, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
45 news outlets
twitter
26 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
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Title
New Business Models to Accelerate Innovation in Pediatric Oncology Therapeutics
Published in
JAMA Oncology, September 2018
DOI 10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.1739
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sonya Das, Raphaël Rousseau, Peter C. Adamson, Andrew W. Lo

Abstract

Few patient populations are as helpless and in need of advocacy as children with cancer. Pharmaceutical companies have historically faced significant financial disincentives to pursue pediatric oncology therapeutics, including low incidence, high costs of conducting pediatric trials, and a lack of funding for early-stage research. Review of published studies of pediatric oncology research and the cost of drug development, as well as clinical trials of pediatric oncology therapeutics at ClinicalTrials.gov, identified 77 potential drug development projects to be included in a hypothetical portfolio. The returns of this portfolio were simulated so as to compute the financial returns and risk. Simulated business strategies include combining projects at different clinical phases of development, obtaining partial funding from philanthropic grants, and obtaining government guarantees to reduce risk. The purely private-sector portfolio exhibited expected returns ranging from -24.2% to 10.2%, depending on the model variables assumed. This finding suggests significant financial disincentives for pursuing pediatric oncology therapeutics and implies that financial support from the public and philanthropic sectors is essential. Phase diversification increases the likelihood of a successful drug and yielded expected returns of -5.3% to 50.1%. Standard philanthropic grants had a marginal association with expected returns, and government guarantees had a greater association by reducing downside exposure. An assessment of a proposed venture philanthropy fund demonstrated stronger performance than the purely private-sector-funded portfolio or those with traditional amounts of philanthropic support. A combination of financial and business strategies has the potential to maximize expected return while eliminating some downside risk-in certain cases enabling expected returns as high as 50.1%-that can overcome current financial disincentives and accelerate the development of pediatric oncology therapeutics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 26 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Researcher 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 8 28%
Unknown 7 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 17%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 10%
Social Sciences 3 10%
Computer Science 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 8 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 383. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 August 2020.
All research outputs
#46,826
of 18,496,698 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Oncology
#97
of 2,541 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,521
of 291,371 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Oncology
#8
of 116 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,496,698 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,541 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 79.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,371 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 116 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.