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Seaweed Communities in Retreat from Ocean Warming

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, November 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
210 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
384 Mendeley
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Title
Seaweed Communities in Retreat from Ocean Warming
Published in
Current Biology, November 2011
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2011.09.028
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Wernberg, Bayden D. Russell, Mads S. Thomsen, C. Frederico D. Gurgel, Corey J.A. Bradshaw, Elvira S. Poloczanska, Sean D. Connell

Abstract

In recent decades, global climate change [1] has caused profound biological changes across the planet [2-6]. However, there is a great disparity in the strength of evidence among different ecosystems and between hemispheres: changes on land have been well documented through long-term studies, but similar direct evidence for impacts of warming is virtually absent from the oceans [3, 7], where only a few studies on individual species of intertidal invertebrates, plankton, and commercially important fish in the North Atlantic and North Pacific exist. This disparity of evidence is precarious for biological conservation because of the critical role of the marine realm in regulating the Earth's environmental and ecological functions, and the associated socioeconomic well-being of humans [8]. We interrogated a database of >20,000 herbarium records of macroalgae collected in Australia since the 1940s and documented changes in communities and geographical distribution limits in both the Indian and Pacific Oceans, consistent with rapid warming over the past five decades [9, 10]. We show that continued warming might drive potentially hundreds of species toward and beyond the edge of the Australian continent where sustained retreat is impossible. The potential for global extinctions is profound considering the many endemic seaweeds and seaweed-dependent marine organisms in temperate Australia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 384 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 5 1%
Spain 4 1%
United States 3 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 361 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 77 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 76 20%
Student > Master 69 18%
Student > Bachelor 51 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 4%
Other 60 16%
Unknown 35 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 187 49%
Environmental Science 89 23%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 18 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 2%
Social Sciences 5 1%
Other 17 4%
Unknown 59 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 December 2019.
All research outputs
#492,903
of 15,339,977 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#1,841
of 10,909 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,675
of 114,219 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#15
of 110 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,339,977 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,909 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 43.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 114,219 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 110 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.