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Malignant ameloblastoma (metastatic ameloblastoma) in the lung: 3 cases of misdiagnosis as primary lung tumor with a unique growth pattern

Overview of attention for article published in Diagnostic Pathology, July 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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19 Mendeley
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Title
Malignant ameloblastoma (metastatic ameloblastoma) in the lung: 3 cases of misdiagnosis as primary lung tumor with a unique growth pattern
Published in
Diagnostic Pathology, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13000-015-0367-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rui Bi, Lei Shen, Xiongzeng Zhu, Xiaoli Xu

Abstract

Malignant ameloblastoma (metastatic ameloblastoma, MA) is currently defined as a distinct pathologic entity, MA, despite its histologically benign appearance. According to the new criteria, the histological and clinical features of MA are more homogenous. Here, we report three cases of histologically confirmed pulmonary MA. Two of the three patients complained of chest pain as the primary symptom, and the other case was detected upon the evaluation of pulmonary nodules found during a health examination after a local recurrence of mandible ameloblastoma. All three patients were female with an average age of 48 years. The intervals between the primary ameloblastoma and metastasis to the lung were 14 years, 19 years and 10 years, averaging 14.3 years. Prior to metastasis to the lung, only one patient experienced local recurrences, at 5 and 19 years after the primary tumor resection, while the other two patients both remained disease-free. Computed tomography (CT) or X-ray evaluation demonstrated multiple bilateral lung nodules ranging in size from several millimeters up to 2 cm. Histologically, the pulmonary metastatic tumors showed a unique growth pattern: the tumor cells grew among the interstitial alveoli but did not appear to destructively infiltrate the surrounding tissue. Immunohistochemically, the MA cells expressed squamous differentiation markers, such as CK10/13 and p63, while the alveolar epithelial cells stained for TTF1 and PE10. In this paper, we discuss the clinical behavior, differential diagnosis and unique growth pattern of pulmonary MA.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 3 16%
Student > Master 3 16%
Professor 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 6 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Psychology 1 5%
Unknown 6 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2015.
All research outputs
#6,748,465
of 12,450,849 outputs
Outputs from Diagnostic Pathology
#203
of 760 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,864
of 235,296 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diagnostic Pathology
#29
of 62 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,450,849 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 760 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,296 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 62 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.