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Acute phase proteins as local biomarkers of respiratory infection in calves

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, July 2015
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Title
Acute phase proteins as local biomarkers of respiratory infection in calves
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12917-015-0485-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Annette Prohl, Wieland Schroedl, Heidrun Rhode, Petra Reinhold

Abstract

Cumulating reports suggest that acute phase proteins (APPs) do not only play a role as systemic inflammatory mediators, but are also expressed in different tissues as local reaction to inflammatory stimuli. The present study aimed to evaluate presence and changes in luminal lung concentrations of the APPs haptoglobin (Hp), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), C-reactive protein (CRP), and lactoferrin (Lf) in calves with an acute respiratory disease experimentally induced by Chlamydia (C.) psittaci. Intra-bronchial inoculation of the pathogen resulted in a consistent respiratory illness. In venous blood of the infected calves (n = 13), concentrations of plasma proteins and serum LBP were assessed (i) before exposure and (ii) 8 times within 14 days after inoculation (dpi). Increasing clinical illness correlated significantly with increasing LBP-and decreasing albumin concentrations in blood, both verifying a systemic acute phase response. Broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained from all 13 calves experimentally infected with C. psittaci at 4, 9 and 14 dpi, and from 6 uninfected healthy calves. Concentrations of bovine serum albumin (BSA), Hp, LBP, CRP and Lf in BALF were determined by ELISA. In infected animals, absolute concentrations of LBP and Hp in BALF correlated significantly with the respiratory score. The quotient [LBP]/[BSA] in BALF peaked significantly in acutely infected animals (4 dpi), showed a time-dependent decrease during the recovery phase (9-14 dpi), and was significantly higher compared to healthy controls. Concentrations of Hp and Lf in BALF as well as [Hp]/[BSA]-and [Lf]/[BSA]-quotients decreased during the study in infected animals, but were never higher than in healthy controls. CRP concentrations and [CRP]/[BSA]-quotient did not express significant differences between infected and healthy animals or during the course of infection. In conclusion, absolute concentrations of LBP in blood and BALF as well as the quotient [LBP]/[BSA] in BALF perfectly paralleled the clinical course of respiratory illness after infection. Beside LBP, the suitability of Hp and Lf as local biomarkers of respiratory infections in cattle and their role in the local response to pathogens is worth further investigation, while CRP does not seem to play a role in local defense mechanisms of the bovine lung.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 3%
Unknown 32 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 10 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 July 2015.
All research outputs
#3,801,317
of 5,402,352 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#585
of 932 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,157
of 189,215 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#47
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,402,352 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 932 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.