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A novel approach to quantifying the spatiotemporal behavior of instrumented grey seals used to sample the environment

Overview of attention for article published in Movement Ecology, July 2015
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Title
A novel approach to quantifying the spatiotemporal behavior of instrumented grey seals used to sample the environment
Published in
Movement Ecology, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40462-015-0047-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laurie L Baker, Joanna E Mills Flemming, Ian D Jonsen, Damian C Lidgard, Sara J Iverson, W Don Bowen

Abstract

Paired with satellite location telemetry, animal-borne instruments can collect spatiotemporal data describing the animal's movement and environment at a scale relevant to its behavior. Ecologists have developed methods for identifying the area(s) used by an animal (e.g., home range) and those used most intensely (utilization distribution) based on location data. However, few have extended these models beyond their traditional roles as descriptive 2D summaries of point data. Here we demonstrate how the home range method, T-LoCoH, can be expanded to quantify collective sampling coverage by multiple instrumented animals using grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) equipped with GPS tags and acoustic transceivers on the Scotian Shelf (Atlantic Canada) as a case study. At the individual level, we illustrate how time and space-use metrics quantifying individual sampling coverage may be used to determine the rate of acoustic transmissions received. Grey seals collectively sampled an area of 11,308 km (2) and intensely sampled an area of 31 km (2) from June-December. The largest area sampled was in July (2094.56 km (2)) and the smallest area sampled occurred in August (1259.80 km (2)), with changes in sampling coverage observed through time. T-LoCoH provides an effective means to quantify changes in collective sampling effort by multiple instrumented animals and to compare these changes across time. We also illustrate how time and space-use metrics of individual instrumented seal movement calculated using T-LoCoH can be used to account for differences in the amount of time a bioprobe (biological sampling platform) spends in an area.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Canada 1 2%
South Africa 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 48 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 24%
Student > Master 10 19%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 1 2%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 40 74%
Environmental Science 5 9%
Mathematics 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 4 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2015.
All research outputs
#2,879,820
of 5,422,277 outputs
Outputs from Movement Ecology
#51
of 71 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,488
of 189,295 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Movement Ecology
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,422,277 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 71 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.9. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,295 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.