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Recognizing spatial and temporal clustering patterns of dengue outbreaks in Taiwan

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2018
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Title
Recognizing spatial and temporal clustering patterns of dengue outbreaks in Taiwan
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12879-018-3159-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wei-Ting Lai, Chien-Hsiun Chen, Hsin Hung, Ray-Bing Chen, Sanjay Shete, Chih-Chieh Wu

Abstract

Dengue fever is the most common arboviral infection in humans, with viral transmissions occurring in more than 100 countries in tropical regions. A global strategy for dengue prevention and control was established more than 10 years ago. However, the factors that drive the transmission of the dengue virus and subsequent viral infection continue unabated. The largest dengue outbreaks in Taiwan since World War II occurred in two recent successive years: 2014 and 2015. We performed a systematic analysis to detect and recognize spatial and temporal clustering patterns of dengue incidence in geographical areas of Taiwan, using the map-based pattern recognition procedure and scan test. Our aim was to recognize geographical heterogeneity patterns of varying dengue incidence intensity and detect hierarchical incidence intensity clusters. Using the map-based pattern recognition procedure, we identified and delineated two separate hierarchical dengue incidence intensity clusters that comprise multiple mutually adjacent geographical units with high dengue incidence rates. We also found that that dengue incidence tends to peak simultaneously and homogeneously among the neighboring geographic units with high rates in the same cluster. Beyond significance testing, this study is particularly desired by and useful for health authorities who require optimal characteristics of disease incidence patterns on maps and over time. Among the integrated components for effective prevention and control of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever are active surveillance and community-based integrated mosquito control, for which this study provides valuable inferences. Effective dengue prevention and control programs in Taiwan are critical, and have the added benefit of controlling the potential emergence of Zika.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 20%
Researcher 7 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 11 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 8%
Unspecified 3 6%
Mathematics 3 6%
Other 12 24%
Unknown 14 29%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 June 2018.
All research outputs
#18,637,483
of 23,088,369 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#5,671
of 7,747 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#254,957
of 329,877 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#97
of 134 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,088,369 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 134 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.