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Influence of peanut matrix on stability of allergens in gastric-simulated digesta: 2S albumins are main contributors to the IgE reactivity of short digestion-resistant peptides

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical & Experimental Allergy, March 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
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6 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

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29 Mendeley
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Title
Influence of peanut matrix on stability of allergens in gastric-simulated digesta: 2S albumins are main contributors to the IgE reactivity of short digestion-resistant peptides
Published in
Clinical & Experimental Allergy, March 2018
DOI 10.1111/cea.13113
Pubmed ID
Authors

I. Prodic, D. Stanic-Vucinic, D. Apostolovic, J. Mihailovic, M. Radibratovic, J. Radosavljevic, L. Burazer, M. Milcic, K. Smiljanic, M. van Hage, T. Cirkovic Velickovic

Abstract

Most food allergens sensitizing via the gastrointestinal tract are stable proteins that are resistant to pepsin digestion, in particular major peanut allergens, Ara h 2 and Ara h 6. Survival of their large fragments is essential for sensitizing capacity. However, the immunoreactive proteins/peptides to which the immune system of the gastrointestinal tract is exposed during digestion of peanut proteins is unknown. Particularly, the IgE-reactivity of short digestion-resistant peptides (<10 kDa) released by gastric digestion under standardized and physiologically relevant in vitro conditions has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate and identify digestion products of major peanut allergens and in particular to examine IgE reactivity of short digestion-resistant peptides released by pepsin digestion of whole peanut grains. Two-dimension gel-based proteomics and shotgun peptidomics, immunoblotting with allergen-specific antibodies from peanut sensitised patients, enzyme-linked immunosorbent inhibition assay and ImmunoCAP tests, including far ultraviolet-circular dichroism spectroscopy were used to identify and characterize peanut digesta. Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 remained mostly intact, and short digestion-resistant peptides from Ara h 2 were more potent in inhibiting IgE binding than Ara h 1 and Ara 3. Ara h 1 and Ara h 3 exhibited sequential digestion into a series of digestion-resistant peptides with preserved allergenic capacity. A high number of identified short digestion-resistant peptides from Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3 were part of short continuous epitope sequences and possessed substantial allergenic potential. Peanut grain digestion by oral and gastric phase enzymes generates mixture of products, where the major peanut allergens remain intact and their digested peptides have preserved allergenic capacity highlighting their important roles in allergic reactions to peanut. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 14%
Student > Master 2 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 8 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 21%
Chemistry 4 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 11 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,848,064
of 13,043,953 outputs
Outputs from Clinical & Experimental Allergy
#1,065
of 2,766 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,900
of 270,467 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical & Experimental Allergy
#21
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,043,953 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,766 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,467 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.