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Four-year effects of exercise on fatigue and physical activity in patients with cancer

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

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132 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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87 Mendeley
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Title
Four-year effects of exercise on fatigue and physical activity in patients with cancer
Published in
BMC Medicine, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12916-018-1075-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lenja Witlox, Anouk E. Hiensch, Miranda J. Velthuis, Charlotte N. Steins Bisschop, Maartje Los, Frans L. G. Erdkamp, Haiko J. Bloemendal, Marlies Verhaar, Daan ten Bokkel Huinink, Elsken van der Wall, Petra H. M. Peeters, Anne M. May

Abstract

In the earlier randomized controlled Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment (PACT) study, we found beneficial effects of an 18-week supervised exercise program on fatigue in patients with newly diagnosed breast or colon cancer undergoing adjuvant treatment. The present study assessed long-term effects of the exercise program on levels of fatigue and physical activity 4 years after participation in the PACT study. The original study was a two-armed, multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing an 18-week supervised exercise program to usual care among 204 breast cancer patients and 33 colon cancer patients undergoing adjuvant treatment. Of the 237 PACT participants, 197 participants were eligible and approached to participate in the 4-year post-baseline measurements, and 128 patients responded. We assessed fatigue and physical activity levels at 4 years post-baseline and compared this to levels at baseline, post-intervention (18 weeks post-baseline), and at 36 weeks post-baseline. Intention-to-treat mixed linear effects model analyses showed that cancer patients in the intervention group reported significantly higher moderate-to-vigorous total physical activity levels (141.46 min/week (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.31, 281.61, effect size (ES) = 0.22) after 4 years compared to the usual care group. Furthermore, cancer patients in the intervention group tended to experience less physical fatigue at 4 years post-baseline compared to the usual care group (- 1.13, 95% CI -2.45, 0.20, ES = 0.22), although the result was not statistically significant. Patients with breast or colon cancer who participated in the 18-week exercise intervention showed significant higher levels of moderate-to-vigorous total physical activity levels and a tendency towards lower physical fatigue levels 4 years post-baseline. Our result indicate that exercising during chemotherapy is a promising strategy for minimizing treatment-related side effects, both short and long term. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN43801571 , Dutch Trial Register NTR2138 . Trial registered on 9 December 2009.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 132 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 87 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 17 20%
Student > Master 13 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Researcher 6 7%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 17 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 23 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 20%
Sports and Recreations 16 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 23 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 88. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2018.
All research outputs
#207,684
of 14,321,429 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#185
of 2,232 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,362
of 276,307 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,321,429 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,232 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,307 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them