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Navigating uncharted territory: a qualitative study of the experience of transitioning to wheelchair use among older adults and their care providers

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Geriatrics, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Navigating uncharted territory: a qualitative study of the experience of transitioning to wheelchair use among older adults and their care providers
Published in
BMC Geriatrics, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12877-015-0092-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edward M. Giesbrecht, William C. Miller, Roberta L. Woodgate

Abstract

An increasing number of older adults are procuring a wheelchair for mobility; however, the corresponding impact on related injuries, caregiver burden, and participation restriction is concerning. To inform the development of a wheelchair training program, we pursued a clearer understanding of the experience transitioning to wheelchair use for older adult users and their care provider. Six focus groups were conducted with older experienced wheelchair users (n = 10) and care providers (n = 4). Transcripts were analyzed using a Conventional Content approach; a coding framework enabled inductive theming and summary of the data. Three themes emerged from the user group: On My Own reflected both limited training and the necessity of venturing out, More Than Meets the Eye addressing barriers to use, and Interdependence between wheelchair users and the ambulatory community. Care provider responses fell into two themes: the All Encompassing impact of assumed responsibilities and Even the Best Laid Plans, where unpredictable and inaccessible environments sabotaged participation. The transition from ambulatory to wheelchair mobility can feel like uncharted territory. Balanced support and appropriate mentorship are fundamentally important and real-world encounters optimize independence and proficiency with skills. The impact on care providers is extensive, highlighting the importance of skills training.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Canada 1 4%
Unknown 25 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 19%
Researcher 5 19%
Student > Master 4 15%
Professor 3 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Other 7 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 22%
Engineering 2 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Other 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2017.
All research outputs
#5,243,160
of 10,467,089 outputs
Outputs from BMC Geriatrics
#635
of 1,038 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,927
of 235,221 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Geriatrics
#21
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,467,089 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,038 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,221 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.