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Prevalence of excessive screen time and TV viewing among Brazilian adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Jornal de Pediatria, March 2019
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Title
Prevalence of excessive screen time and TV viewing among Brazilian adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Published in
Jornal de Pediatria, March 2019
DOI 10.1016/j.jped.2018.04.011
Pubmed ID
Authors

Camila W. Schaan, Felipe V. Cureau, Mariana Sbaraini, Karen Sparrenberger, Harold W. Kohl III, Beatriz D. Schaan

Abstract

To evaluate the prevalence of excessive screen-based behaviors among Brazilian adolescents through a systematic review with meta-analysis. Systematic review and meta-analysis were recorded in the International Prospective Register of Ongoing Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO-CRD 2017 CRD42017074432). This review included observational studies (cohort or cross-sectional) that evaluated the prevalence of excessive screen time (i.e. combinations involving different screen-based behaviors) or TV viewing (≥2h/day or >2h/day in front of screen) through indirect or direct methods in adolescents aged between 10 and 19 years. The research strategy included the following databases: MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO and ADOLEC. The search strategy included terms for "screen time", "Brazil", and "prevalence". Random effect models were used to estimate the prevalence of excessive screen time in different categories. Twenty-eight out of 775 studies identified in the search met the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of excessive screen time and TV viewing was 70.9% (95% CI: 65.5-76.1) and 58.8% (95% CI: 49.4-68.0), respectively. There was no difference between genders in both analyses. The majority of studies included showed a low risk of bias. The prevalence of excessive screen time and TV viewing was high among Brazilian adolescents. Intervention studies are needed to reduce the excessive screen time among adolescents.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 92 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 16%
Student > Bachelor 14 15%
Student > Postgraduate 9 10%
Researcher 8 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 25 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 19 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 16%
Sports and Recreations 9 10%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Psychology 3 3%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 31 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2018.
All research outputs
#11,581,860
of 13,034,624 outputs
Outputs from Jornal de Pediatria
#412
of 530 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#234,500
of 270,513 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Jornal de Pediatria
#20
of 23 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 530 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.