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Is It Ethical to Treat Pain Differently in Children and Adults with Burns?

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, June 2018
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3 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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6 Mendeley
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Title
Is It Ethical to Treat Pain Differently in Children and Adults with Burns?
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, June 2018
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2018.20.6.cscm1-1806
Pubmed ID
Abstract

This commentary discusses ethical implications of the common practice of treating children's and adults' burn pain differently. Physicians have obligations to ensure that (1) their own discomfort with children's pain doesn't lead them to make pain management decisions that could place a patient at greater risk and (2) to engage in thoughtful, individualized pain management strategies. Long-term consequences of overzealous pain medication administration, for example, could include delayed recovery and integration or opioid dependence. The need to create individualized approaches to pain management, based on published guidelines, is discussed along with uses of nonpharmacological treatment for both adults and children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Librarian 1 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 17%
Other 1 17%
Student > Master 1 17%
Unknown 2 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 17%
Social Sciences 1 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 17%
Unknown 2 33%