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Rapid assessment of lamp spectrum to quantify ecological effects of light at night

Overview of attention for article published in THE JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL ZOOLOGY, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 127)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
33 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
56 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
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Title
Rapid assessment of lamp spectrum to quantify ecological effects of light at night
Published in
THE JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL ZOOLOGY, June 2018
DOI 10.1002/jez.2184
Pubmed ID
Authors

Travis Longcore, Airam Rodríguez, Blair Witherington, Jay F. Penniman, Lorna Herf, Michael Herf

Abstract

For many decades, the spectral composition of lighting was determined by the type of lamp, which also influenced potential effects of outdoor lights on species and ecosystems. Light-emitting diode (LED) lamps have dramatically increased the range of spectral profiles of light that is economically viable for outdoor lighting. Because of the array of choices, it is necessary to develop methods to predict the effects of different spectral profiles without conducting field studies, especially because older lighting systems are being replaced rapidly. We describe an approach to predict responses of exemplar organisms and groups to lamps of different spectral output by calculating an index based on action spectra from behavioral or visual characteristics of organisms and lamp spectral irradiance. We calculate relative response indices for a range of lamp types and light sources and develop an index that identifies lamps that minimize predicted effects as measured by ecological, physiological, and astronomical indices. Using these assessment metrics, filtered yellow-green and amber LEDs are predicted to have lower effects on wildlife than high pressure sodium lamps, while blue-rich lighting (e.g., K ≥ 2200) would have greater effects. The approach can be updated with new information about behavioral or visual responses of organisms and used to test new lighting products based on spectrum. Together with control of intensity, direction, and duration, the approach can be used to predict and then minimize the adverse effects of lighting and can be tailored to individual species or taxonomic groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 56 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 62 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 18%
Other 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Master 6 10%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 8 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 37%
Environmental Science 17 27%
Physics and Astronomy 2 3%
Psychology 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 14 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 308. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2020.
All research outputs
#41,923
of 14,242,969 outputs
Outputs from THE JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL ZOOLOGY
#1
of 127 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,899
of 275,836 outputs
Outputs of similar age from THE JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL ZOOLOGY
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,242,969 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 127 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,836 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them