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Do patients actually do what we ask

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Hypertension, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
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Title
Do patients actually do what we ask
Published in
Journal of Hypertension, August 2018
DOI 10.1097/hjh.0000000000001738
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claire L. Schwartz, Ashkon Seyed-Safi, Sayeed Haque, Emma P. Bray, Shelia Greenfield, F.D. Richard Hobbs, Paul Little, Jonathan Mant, Bryan Williams, Richard J. Mcmanus

Abstract

Self-management of hypertension can reduce and control blood pressure (BP) compared with clinic monitoring. However, self-management relies on patients following an algorithm, which may be variably adhered to. This study reports fidelity of high-risk patients to the self-management algorithm set by the TASMIN-SR trial. Patients with hypertension, above target clinic BP and one or more of stroke, diabetes, coronary heart disease or chronic kidney disease, were invited to self-monitor following an individualized self-titration algorithm. Home BP readings and medication change details were submitted monthly for 12 months. Readings downloaded from patients' electronic monitors were compared with written submissions, and protocol fidelity was assessed. Two hundred and seventy-six patients were randomized to self-management and 225 (82%) completed the required training sessions. Of these, 166 (74%) completed self-management. A total of 11385 (89.6%) submitted readings were accurate compared with corresponding downloaded monitor readings. Mean error rate was 5.2% per patient, which increased with age but not comorbidities. Patients made 475 of 683 (69.5%) algorithm-recommended medication changes, equating to nearly three medication changes per patient. Mean SBP for patients who completed training and made all recommended changes dropped from 141 mmHg (95% CI 138.26-144.46) to 121 mmHg (95% CI 118.30-124.17 mmHg) compared with 129 mmHg (95% CI 125.27-136.73 mmHg) for patients who made none. Most patients randomized to self-management completed training; however, 36% of these had dropped out by 12 months. Self-monitoring was largely undertaken properly and accurately recorded. Fidelity with self-management was associated with lower achieved SBP. Successful implementation of self-management into daily practice requires careful training and should be accompanied by monitoring of fidelity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 22%
Student > Master 9 16%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Researcher 4 7%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 13 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 17 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2018.
All research outputs
#7,940,889
of 15,045,928 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Hypertension
#1,518
of 4,026 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,732
of 276,920 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Hypertension
#28
of 107 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,045,928 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,026 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,920 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 107 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.