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Impact of parental migration on psychosocial well-being of children left behind: a qualitative study in rural China

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Equity in Health, June 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
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Title
Impact of parental migration on psychosocial well-being of children left behind: a qualitative study in rural China
Published in
International Journal for Equity in Health, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12939-018-0795-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chenyue Zhao, Feng Wang, Xudong Zhou, Minmin Jiang, Therese Hesketh

Abstract

Tens of millions of rural "left-behind children (LBC)" in China grow up experiencing prolonged separation from their migrant worker parents. This study aimed to explore how children are affected by parental migration, from the perspectives of children, parents, and grandparents, focusing on the experiences of prolonged parent-child separation and relationship dynamics in the extended family. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted in a migrant-sending rural area of eastern China. Participants included 25 children (aged 7 to 14), 17 parents, and 13 grandparents, from 30 families, as well as 24 key informants from the communities. Data analysis followed a grounded theory approach. The results showed that despite the original purpose of benefiting children, parental migration resulted in challenges in child psychosocial well-being, due to the emotional impacts from prolonged parent-child separation. Parental absence also led to inadequate care and support for left-behind children. The negative effects of parental migration may be exacerbated by other vulnerabilities such as parents' divorce, poverty and grandparent caregivers' frailty. Concerns about child well-being made some migrants decide to return home permanently, because of the altered trade-offs of migration. Prolonged separation following migration often disrupts parent-child relationships and results in psychosocial difficulties in LBC, especially among those who live with multiple adversities in the family. Community-based interventions may help migrant parents and co-resident caregivers to better engage children and promote their resilience.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 21%
Student > Bachelor 9 15%
Researcher 6 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 17 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 20%
Psychology 11 18%
Social Sciences 11 18%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 18 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2018.
All research outputs
#1,960,739
of 13,853,357 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Equity in Health
#316
of 1,158 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,402
of 231,815 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Equity in Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,853,357 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,158 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,815 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them