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Altered modulation of gamma oscillation frequency by speed of visual motion in children with autism spectrum disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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Citations

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70 Mendeley
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Title
Altered modulation of gamma oscillation frequency by speed of visual motion in children with autism spectrum disorders
Published in
Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s11689-015-9121-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tatiana A. Stroganova, Anna V. Butorina, Olga V. Sysoeva, Andrey O. Prokofyev, Anastasia Yu. Nikolaeva, Marina M. Tsetlin, Elena V. Orekhova

Abstract

Recent studies link autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with an altered balance between excitation and inhibition (E/I balance) in cortical networks. The brain oscillations in high gamma-band (50-120 Hz) are sensitive to the E/I balance and may appear useful biomarkers of certain ASD subtypes. The frequency of gamma oscillations is mediated by level of excitation of the fast-spiking inhibitory basket cells recruited by increasing strength of excitatory input. Therefore, the experimental manipulations affecting gamma frequency may throw light on inhibitory networks dysfunction in ASD. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate modulation of visual gamma oscillation frequency by speed of drifting annular gratings (1.2, 3.6, 6.0 °/s) in 21 boys with ASD and 26 typically developing boys aged 7-15 years. Multitaper method was used for analysis of spectra of gamma power change upon stimulus presentation and permutation test was applied for statistical comparisons. We also assessed in our participants visual orientation discrimination thresholds, which are thought to depend on excitability of inhibitory networks in the visual cortex. Although frequency of the oscillatory gamma response increased with increasing velocity of visual motion in both groups of participants, the velocity effect was reduced in a substantial proportion of children with ASD. The range of velocity-related gamma frequency modulation correlated inversely with the ability to discriminate oblique line orientation in the ASD group, while no such correlation has been observed in the group of typically developing participants. Our findings suggest that abnormal velocity-related gamma frequency modulation in ASD may constitute a potential biomarker for reduced excitability of fast-spiking inhibitory neurons in a subset of children with ASD.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 1%
Israel 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 65 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 17%
Student > Master 12 17%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 8 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 22 31%
Psychology 13 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 9%
Engineering 3 4%
Computer Science 3 4%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 12 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 December 2017.
All research outputs
#5,013,043
of 15,886,171 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#165
of 333 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,778
of 237,248 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,886,171 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 333 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,248 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them