↓ Skip to main content

Mudanças no deslocamento para o trabalho e na atividade física da população de três municípios da região de São Paulo nos anos de 2000 e 2010

Overview of attention for article published in Revista Brasileira de Epidemiologia, June 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Mudanças no deslocamento para o trabalho e na atividade física da população de três municípios da região de São Paulo nos anos de 2000 e 2010
Published in
Revista Brasileira de Epidemiologia, June 2017
DOI 10.1590/1980-5497201700020008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Josivaldo de Souza Lima, Gerson Luis de Moraes Ferrari, Tatiane Kosimenko Ferrari, Timóteo Leandro Araujo, Victor Keihan Rodrigues Matsudo

Abstract

To evaluate the changes in commuting to work and physical activity (PA) in the population of three municipalities in the São Paulo region in 2000 and 2010. Cross-sectional study with a representative sample of 602 adults (62.3% men) carried out in the municipalities of Santo André, São Bernardo do Campo and São Caetano do Sul in 2000 (n = 304; 66.1% men) and 2010 (n = 298; 58.4% men). Physical activity was assessed by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and participants were classified into active (≥ 150 min/week) and insufficiently active (< 150 min/week). The commuting to work was classified in active transport (walking and cycling), private (bike, car, vans and buses) and public (buses, vans, train or subway). Average (min/week) PA walk (229.4 versus 190.6), moderate (449.1 versus 347.4), vigorous (354.4 versus 317.4) and total (552.3 versus 442.5) shows the participants were greater in 2010 than in 2000. The prevalence assets increased from 62.2 to 78.2%, respectively. A negative relationship was found between active transport and public with socioeconomic status; active transport and education level; public transport and age. Positive relationship was found only among private transport and socioeconomic status. The average of the total PA (min/week) was higher (p = 0.024; 32.2%) in 2010 than in 2000 for active transport. Surveillance data in full PA in the three municipalities of São Paulo indicate that the average active commuting to work increased after ten years, while public transport has decreased.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 31%
Student > Postgraduate 3 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 15%
Professor 1 8%
Unknown 3 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 3 23%
Sports and Recreations 3 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 15%
Psychology 1 8%
Unknown 4 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2018.
All research outputs
#10,447,169
of 13,104,802 outputs
Outputs from Revista Brasileira de Epidemiologia
#97
of 165 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,579
of 268,217 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista Brasileira de Epidemiologia
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,104,802 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 165 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,217 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them