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The effects of frenotomy on breastfeeding

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Applied Oral Science, March 2015
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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21 Dimensions

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103 Mendeley
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Title
The effects of frenotomy on breastfeeding
Published in
Journal of Applied Oral Science, March 2015
DOI 10.1590/1678-775720140339
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martinelli, Roberta Lopes de Castro, Marchesan, Irene Queiroz, Gusmão, Reinaldo Jordão, Honório, Heitor Marques, Berretin-Felix, Giédre, Roberta Lopes de Castro MARTINELLI, Irene Queiroz MARCHESAN, Reinaldo Jordão GUSMÃO, Heitor Marques HONÓRIO, Giédre BERRETIN-FELIX

Abstract

Although the interference of tongue-tie with breastfeeding is a controversial subject, The use of lingual frenotomy has been widely indicated by health professionals. To observe changes in breastfeeding patterns after lingual frenotomy concerning the number of sucks, pause length between groups of sucking and mother's complaints. Oral yes/no questions about breastfeeding symptoms and sucking/swallowing/breathing coordination were answered by the mothers of 109, 30 day old infants. On the same day the infants had their lingual frenulum assessed by administering a lingual frenulum protocol. After the assessment, all tongue-tied infants were referred for frenotomy; nevertheless, only 14 underwent the surgery. Of the 109 infants, 14 infants who did not have frenulum alterations were included as controls. Birth order and gender were the criteria for recruiting the control group. The tongue-tied infants underwent lingual frenotomy at 45 days of age. At the conclusion of the frenotomy, the infants were breastfed. At 75 days old, both groups - control and post-frenotomy - were reassessed. Before the reassessment the same oral yes/no questions were answered by the mothers of the 14 infants who underwent frenotomy. The mothers of the control group answered the questionnaire only at the time of the first assessment. Data were subjected to statistical analysis. After frenotomy, the number of sucks increased and the pause length between sucking decreased during breastfeeding. The controls maintained the same patterns observed in the first assessment. From the questionnaire answered by the mothers of the 14 tongue-tied infants, at 30 days and 75 days, we observed that the symptoms concerning breastfeeding and sucking/swallowing/breathing coordination were improved after lingual frenotomy Conclusions : after lingual frenotomy, changes were observed in the breastfeeding patterns of the the tongue-tied infants while the control group maintained the same patterns. Moreover, all symptoms reported by the mothers of the tongue-tied infants had improved after frenotomy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 100 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 23%
Student > Bachelor 11 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Researcher 9 9%
Student > Postgraduate 8 8%
Other 23 22%
Unknown 17 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 22 21%
Social Sciences 5 5%
Linguistics 3 3%
Arts and Humanities 3 3%
Other 8 8%
Unknown 18 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2017.
All research outputs
#7,220,401
of 12,019,430 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Applied Oral Science
#10
of 27 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,477
of 236,609 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Applied Oral Science
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,019,430 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 27 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one scored the same or higher as 17 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,609 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.