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Effects of heat stress and dehydration on cognitive function in elite female field hockey players

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of heat stress and dehydration on cognitive function in elite female field hockey players
Published in
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13102-018-0101-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hannah MacLeod, Simon Cooper, Stephan Bandelow, Rachel Malcolm, Caroline Sunderland

Abstract

It has previously been suggested that heat exposure and hypohydration have negative effects on cognitive performance, which may impact upon sporting performance. The aim of the present study was to examine the independent effects of heat stress and hypohydration on cognitive performance in elite female field hockey players. Eight unacclimatised elite field hockey players (age: 22 ± 3 y; height: 1.68 ± 0.05 m; body mass: 63.1 ± 6.0 kg) completed a cognitive test battery before and after 50 min of field hockey specific exercise on a treadmill in four experimental trials; two in hot conditions (33.3 ± 0.1 °C), and two in moderate (16.0 ± 3.0 °C), both with and without ad libitum water intake. On the visual search test, participants were faster overall in the heat (1941 vs. 2104 ms, p = 0.001). Response times were quicker in the heat on the Sternberg paradigm (463 vs. 473 ms, p = 0.024) and accuracy was improved (by 1.9%, p = 0.004). There was no effect of hydration status on any of the markers of cognitive function. Overall, the findings suggest that in elite field hockey players exposure to heat enhances response times and/or accuracy on a battery of cognitive function tests. However, hypohydration does not appear to affect cognitive performance in elite field hockey players.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 23%
Student > Bachelor 7 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Lecturer 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 5 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 14 45%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Social Sciences 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2019.
All research outputs
#3,976,122
of 13,698,878 outputs
Outputs from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#109
of 197 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,137
of 268,581 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,698,878 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 197 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,581 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them