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Activity seascapes highlight central place foraging strategies in marine predators that never stop swimming

Overview of attention for article published in Movement Ecology, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#10 of 203)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
86 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
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Title
Activity seascapes highlight central place foraging strategies in marine predators that never stop swimming
Published in
Movement Ecology, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40462-018-0127-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yannis P. Papastamatiou, Yuuki Y. Watanabe, Urška Demšar, Vianey Leos-Barajas, Darcy Bradley, Roland Langrock, Kevin Weng, Christopher G. Lowe, Alan M. Friedlander, Jennifer E. Caselle

Abstract

Central place foragers (CPF) rest within a central place, and theory predicts that distance of patches from this central place sets the outer limits of the foraging arena. Many marine ectothermic predators behave like CPF animals, but never stop swimming, suggesting that predators will incur 'travelling' costs while resting. Currently, it is unknown how these CPF predators behave or how modulation of behavior contributes to daily energy budgets. We combine acoustic telemetry, multi-sensor loggers, and hidden Markov models (HMMs) to generate 'activity seascapes', which combine space use with patterns of activity, for reef sharks (blacktip reef and grey reef sharks) at an unfished Pacific atoll. Sharks of both species occupied a central place during the day within deeper, cooler water where they were less active, and became more active over a larger area at night in shallower water. However, video cameras on two grey reef sharks revealed foraging attempts/success occurring throughout the day, and that multiple sharks were refuging in common areas. A simple bioenergetics model for grey reef sharks predicted that diel changes in energy expenditure are primarily driven by changes in swim speed and not body temperature. We provide a new method for simultaneously visualizing diel space use and behavior in marine predators, which does not require the simultaneous measure of both from each animal. We show that blacktip and grey reef sharks behave as CPFs, with diel changes in activity, horizontal and vertical space use. However, aspects of their foraging behavior may differ from other predictions of traditional CPF models. In particular, for species that never stop swimming, patch foraging times may be unrelated to patch travel distance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 86 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 74 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 20%
Researcher 13 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 12 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 40 54%
Environmental Science 13 18%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 13 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 69. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 August 2020.
All research outputs
#318,222
of 15,657,453 outputs
Outputs from Movement Ecology
#10
of 203 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,929
of 277,356 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Movement Ecology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,657,453 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 203 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,356 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them