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Estudo de validação das equações de Tanaka e de Kawasaki para estimar a excreção diária de sódio através da coleta da urina casual

Overview of attention for article published in Revista Brasileira de Epidemiologia, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 165)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
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Title
Estudo de validação das equações de Tanaka e de Kawasaki para estimar a excreção diária de sódio através da coleta da urina casual
Published in
Revista Brasileira de Epidemiologia, December 2015
DOI 10.1590/1980-5497201500060020
Pubmed ID
Authors

José Geraldo Mill, Sérgio Lamêgo Rodrigues, Marcelo Perim Baldo, Deborah Carvalho Malta, Celia Landmann Szwarcwald

Abstract

To validate Tanaka and Kawasaki's formulas to calculate the salt intake by the sodium/creatinine ratio in spot of urine. Two hundred and seventy two adults (20 - 69 years old; 52.6% women) with 24 h urine collection and two urinary spots collected on the same day (while fasting - spot 1 - or not fasting - spot 2). Anthropometry, blood pressure and fasting blood were measured on the same day. The analysis of agreement between salt consumption measured in the 24 h urine test and urinary spots were determined by the Pearson's correlation (r) and the Bland & Altman method. The mean salt consumption measured by the 24 h sodium excretion was 10.4 ± 5.3 g/day. The correlation between the measured 24 h sodium excretion and the estimation based on spots 1 and 2, respectively, was only moderated according to Tanaka (r = 0.51 and r = 0.55; p < 0.001) and to Kawasaki (r = 0.52 and r = 0.54; p < 0.001). We observed an increasing underestimation of salt consumption by Tanaka to increasing salt consumption and conversely, an overestimation of consumption by the Kawasaki formula. The estimation of salt consumption (difference between measured and calculated salt consumption lower than 1 g/day) was adequate only when the consumption was between 9 - 12 g/day (Tanaka) and 12 - 18 g/day (Kawasaki). Spot urine sampling is adequate to estimate salt consumption only among individuals with an actual consumption near the population mean.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 14%
Student > Master 4 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Professor 2 7%
Other 7 25%
Unknown 5 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 6 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2018.
All research outputs
#1,911,415
of 13,133,585 outputs
Outputs from Revista Brasileira de Epidemiologia
#7
of 165 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,807
of 268,780 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista Brasileira de Epidemiologia
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,133,585 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 165 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,780 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them