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Effect of prenatal EPA and DHA on maternal and umbilical cord blood cytokines

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of prenatal EPA and DHA on maternal and umbilical cord blood cytokines
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12884-018-1899-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ellen L. Mozurkewich, Deborah R. Berman, Anjel Vahratian, Chelsea M. Clinton, Vivian C. Romero, Julie L. Chilimigras, Delia Vazquez, Clifford Qualls, Zora Djuric

Abstract

Investigators have hypothesized that omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may modulate the immune response. However, available evidence is conflicting. We performed this study to investigate the effect of prenatal eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)- and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich fish oil supplementation on maternal and fetal cytokine production. This study is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial designed to assess whether prenatal EPA- or DHA-rich fish oil supplementation would prevent perinatal depressive symptoms among women at risk. Enrolled participants received EPA-rich fish oil (1060 mg EPA plus 274 mg DHA), DHA-rich fish oil (900 mg DHA plus 180 mg EPA) or soy oil placebo. Maternal venous blood was collected at enrollment (12-20 weeks gestation) and after supplementation (34-36 weeks gestation). Umbilical cord blood was collected at delivery. We analyzed stored plasma specimens for 16 human cytokines using multiplex immunoassays. Maternal and cord blood cytokine levels were compared among the treatment groups. Associations of serum DHA and EPA with maternal and cord blood cytokines were explored via regression analysis. We enrolled 126 women, of whom 118 completed the trial. Prenatal supplementation with EPA-rich fish oil significantly lowered maternal IL6, IL15, and TNFα concentrations. However, supplementation with DHA-rich fish oil had no significant effect on maternal cytokine profiles. Maternal serum DHA fraction was significantly associated with IL1α, and maternal serum DHA and EPA fractions were significantly associated with IL 10 concentrations after supplementation. Compared with placebo, supplementation with EPA- or DHA-rich fish oils had no significant effect on cord blood cytokine concentrations. Prenatal supplementation with EPA-rich fish oil significantly reduced levels of several inflammatory cytokines in maternal plasma, while prenatal DHA-rich fish oil had no significant effect on cytokine concentrations. Supplementation with EPA- and DHA- rich fish oil had no significant effect on umbilical cord blood cytokine concentrations. Clinical Trial Registration: registration number NCT00711971 7/7/2008.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Student > Master 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 6 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Psychology 3 9%
Engineering 2 6%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 8 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2018.
All research outputs
#1,969,669
of 13,145,206 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#584
of 2,403 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,874
of 268,719 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,145,206 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,403 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,719 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them