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Evolutionary Aspects of Emerging Lyme Disease in Canada

Overview of attention for article published in Applied & Environmental Microbiology, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Evolutionary Aspects of Emerging Lyme Disease in Canada
Published in
Applied & Environmental Microbiology, August 2015
DOI 10.1128/aem.01671-15
Pubmed ID
Authors

N.H. Ogden, E.J. Feil, P.A. Leighton, L.R. Lindsay, G. Margos, S. Mechai, P. Michel, T.J. Moriarty, N. H. Ogden, E. J. Feil, P. A. Leighton, L. R. Lindsay, T. J. Moriarty

Abstract

In North America, Lyme disease (LD) is a tick-borne zoonosis caused by the spirochaete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), which is maintained by wildlife. Tick vectors and bacteria are currently spreading into Canada and causing increasing numbers of cases of LD in humans and raising a pressing need for public health responses. There is no vaccine and LD prevention depends on knowing who is at risk and informing them how to protect themselves from infection. Recently, it was found in the USA that some strains of B. burgdorferi s.s. cause severe disease, whereas others cause mild, self-limiting disease. While many strains occurring in the USA also occur in Canada, strains in some parts of Canada are different than those in the USA. We therefore a a need to identify which strains specific to Canada can cause severe disease, and to characterize their geographic distribution to determine which Canadians are particularly at risk. In this review, we summarise the history of emergence of LD in North America, our current knowledge of B. burgdorferi s.s. diversity, its intriguing origins in the ecology and evolution of the bacterium, and its importance for the epidemiology, and clinical and laboratory diagnosis of LD. We propose methods for investigating associations between B. burgdorferi s.s. diversity, ecology and pathogenicity, and developing predictive tools to guide public health interventions. We also highlight the emergence of B. burgdorferi s.s. in Canada as a unique opportunity for exploring the evolutionary aspects of tick-borne pathogen emergence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 10%
France 1 5%
Unknown 18 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 19%
Student > Master 4 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Researcher 2 10%
Other 5 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 10%
Mathematics 1 5%
Other 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 February 2017.
All research outputs
#473,224
of 7,822,782 outputs
Outputs from Applied & Environmental Microbiology
#291
of 5,405 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,617
of 229,187 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied & Environmental Microbiology
#18
of 179 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,822,782 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,405 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,187 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 179 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.