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Pretreatment anxiety and pain acceptance are associated with response to trigger point injection therapy for chronic myofascial pain

Overview of attention for article published in Pain Medicine, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
60 Mendeley
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Title
Pretreatment anxiety and pain acceptance are associated with response to trigger point injection therapy for chronic myofascial pain
Published in
Pain Medicine, October 2015
DOI 10.1111/pme.12781
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gerard M. Healy, David P. Finn, David A. O'Gorman, Chris Maharaj, Miriam Raftery, Nancy Ruane, Caroline Mitchell, Kiran Sarma, Marek Bohacek, Brian E. McGuire

Abstract

This study examined the psychosocial profile of patients who responded or did not respond to trigger point injection therapy for chronic myofascial pain. Seventy one patients with a diagnosis of chronic myofascial pain of the paraspinous muscles completed a pretreatment questionnaire measuring demographic and social factors, and validated scales to assess pain intensity, pain interference (physical and emotional), and defined psychological characteristics (pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, pain self-efficacy, mood and anxiety). Trigger point injection therapy of the affected areas of myofascial pain was performed and follow-up was conducted by telephone at one week (n = 65) and one month (n = 63) post intervention to assess treatment outcome (pain intensity and pain-related physical interference). At one week follow-up and one-month follow-up, using pain-related physical interference as the outcome measure, we found that those who responded well to treatment were characterized by a lower level of pretreatment anxiety and a higher level of pain acceptance, with anxiety being the strongest predictor. These results suggest that responses to interventional pain management in chronic myofascial paraspinous pain may be influenced by psychological characteristics, especially pretreatment anxiety.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 59 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 14 23%
Unknown 7 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 35%
Psychology 12 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 18%
Neuroscience 3 5%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 9 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2015.
All research outputs
#917,481
of 12,352,171 outputs
Outputs from Pain Medicine
#221
of 1,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,537
of 245,997 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pain Medicine
#18
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,352,171 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,703 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,997 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.