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Epidemiology and risk factors associated with Anaplasma marginale infection of cattle in Peninsular Malaysia

Overview of attention for article published in Parasitology International, June 2018
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Title
Epidemiology and risk factors associated with Anaplasma marginale infection of cattle in Peninsular Malaysia
Published in
Parasitology International, June 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.parint.2018.06.013
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shola David Ola-Fadunsin, Fufa Ido Gimba, Donea Abdurazak Abdullah, Reuben Sunil Kumar Sharma, Faez Jesse Firdaus Abdullah, Rehana Abdullah Sani

Abstract

Bovine anaplasmosis is a major concern to cattle farming in most parts of the world. Anaplasmosis negatively impacts the profitability of cattle farming by reducing the production, reproduction, and draft ability of cattle. Here, we report results from a one-year cross sectional study to determine the epidemiology and the risk factors for Anaplasma marginale infection of cattle in Peninsular Malaysia. Examination of one thousand and forty five blood samples of apparently healthy cattle from forty-three farms in all the states of Peninsular Malaysia by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay revealed an overall prevalence of A. marginale infection of cattle of 72.6%, showing high endemicity of this heamoprotozoan among cattle in the country. Cattle breeds, production type, herd owner, herd size, management system, farm size, farm age, prophylactic treatment against blood parasites, presence of ticks, frequency of deticking, zones, closeness to forest, closeness to waste area, closeness to human settlement and closeness to body of water were the risk factors significantly associated (P < 0.05) with the detection of A. marginale in cattle. Results of this first molecular study on the epidemiology and risk factors for A. marginale infection of cattle from all the states of Peninsular Malaysia suggest policies and strategies for the prevention and control of the parasite to improve profitability of cattle farming in the country.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 62 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Researcher 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 22 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 18 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Environmental Science 3 5%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 23 37%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2018.
All research outputs
#19,951,180
of 25,385,509 outputs
Outputs from Parasitology International
#731
of 1,214 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#251,862
of 342,889 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasitology International
#11
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,385,509 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,214 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 342,889 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.