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The associations between daily spring pollen counts, over-the-counter allergy medication sales, and asthma syndrome emergency department visits in New York City, 2002-2012

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
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Title
The associations between daily spring pollen counts, over-the-counter allergy medication sales, and asthma syndrome emergency department visits in New York City, 2002-2012
Published in
Environmental Health, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12940-015-0057-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kazuhiko Ito, Kate R. Weinberger, Guy S. Robinson, Perry E. Sheffield, Ramona Lall, Robert Mathes, Zev Ross, Patrick L. Kinney, Thomas D. Matte

Abstract

Many types of tree pollen trigger seasonal allergic illness, but their population-level impacts on allergy and asthma morbidity are not well established, likely due to the paucity of long records of daily pollen data that allow analysis of multi-day effects. Our objective in this study was therefore to determine the impacts of individual spring tree pollen types on over-the-counter allergy medication sales and asthma emergency department (ED) visits. Nine clinically-relevant spring tree pollen genera (elm, poplar, maple, birch, beech, ash, sycamore/London planetree, oak, and hickory) measured in Armonk, NY, were analyzed for their associations with over-the-counter allergy medication sales and daily asthma syndrome ED visits from patients' chief complaints or diagnosis codes in New York City during March 1(st) through June 10(th), 2002-2012. Multi-day impacts of pollen on the outcomes (0-3 days and 0-7 days for the medication sales and ED visits, respectively) were estimated using a distributed lag Poisson time-series model adjusting for temporal trends, day-of-week, weather, and air pollution. For asthma syndrome ED visits, age groups were also analyzed. Year-to-year variation in the average peak dates and the 10(th)-to-90(th) percentile duration between pollen and the outcomes were also examined with Spearman's rank correlation. Mid-spring pollen types (maple, birch, beech, ash, oak, and sycamore/London planetree) showed the strongest significant associations with both outcomes, with cumulative rate ratios up to 2.0 per 0-to-98(th) percentile pollen increase (e.g., 1.9 [95 % CI: 1.7, 2.1] and 1.7 [95 % CI: 1.5, 1.9] for the medication sales and ED visits, respectively, for ash). Lagged associations were longer for asthma syndrome ED visits than for the medication sales. Associations were strongest in children (ages 5-17; e.g., a cumulative rate ratio of 2.6 [95 % CI: 2.1, 3.1] per 0-to-98(th) percentile increase in ash). The average peak dates and durations of some of these mid-spring pollen types were also associated with those of the outcomes. Tree pollen peaking in mid-spring exhibit substantive impacts on allergy, and asthma exacerbations, particularly in children. Given the narrow time window of these pollen peak occurrences, public health and clinical approaches to anticipate and reduce allergy/asthma exacerbation should be developed.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 71 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 28%
Unspecified 17 24%
Student > Master 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Other 13 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 21 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 18%
Environmental Science 13 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 6%
Other 16 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2018.
All research outputs
#460,917
of 12,923,750 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#128
of 1,043 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,095
of 237,968 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,923,750 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,043 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,968 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them