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Dietary changes in migrant adolescents with increasing length of stay in Australia and associated risk of wheeze – a retrospective, cross sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, August 2015
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4 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Dietary changes in migrant adolescents with increasing length of stay in Australia and associated risk of wheeze – a retrospective, cross sectional study
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12887-015-0420-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisa G. Wood, Marivic Lagleva, Smita Shah, Bronwyn S. Berthon, Sally Galbraith, Richard Henry, Helen Kepreotes, Peter G. Gibson

Abstract

Recent studies have reported that asthma prevalence increases on migration to Australia. We hypothesised that changes in dietary intake contribute to this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to assess dietary intake in relation to migration status, length of stay in Australia and the association with self-reported wheeze. Students (n = 144) in a multicultural high school in Western Sydney completed the asthma symptoms ISAAC video questionnaire (AVQ3.0), spirometry and allergy skin prick tests. A dietitian administered a'Food Frequency' and 'Food Habits' questionnaire and a dietary history interview. Students who spoke a language other than English, consumed a traditional or mixed dietary pattern, with lower consumption of saturated fat, compared to students who spoke English only. Saturated fat intake increased and fibre intake decreased with length of time in Australia. Intake of foods high in saturated or trans fatty acids were positively associated with length of stay in Australia. No associations between nutrient intake or whole food intake and self-reported wheeze were observed. As time progressed, dietary intake of immigrant children changed. While this was not associated with the development of wheeze in the students in this cohort, these changes are likely to have negative health consequences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 25%
Student > Bachelor 12 24%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 25%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 8 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2016.
All research outputs
#6,949,778
of 11,621,608 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#808
of 1,336 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,265
of 237,250 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#34
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,621,608 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,336 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,250 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.