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Vulnerability of Arctic marine mammals to vessel traffic in the increasingly ice-free Northwest Passage and Northern Sea Route

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
36 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
341 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
Title
Vulnerability of Arctic marine mammals to vessel traffic in the increasingly ice-free Northwest Passage and Northern Sea Route
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2018
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1803543115
Pubmed ID
Authors

Donna D. W. Hauser, Kristin L. Laidre, Harry L. Stern

Abstract

The fabled Northwest Passage and Northern Sea Route that were once the quests of early Western explorers are now increasingly sea ice-free, with routine vessel transits expected by midcentury. The potential impacts of this novel vessel traffic on endemic Arctic marine mammal (AMM) species are unknown despite their critical social and ecological roles in the ecosystem and widely recognized susceptibility to ice loss. We developed a vulnerability assessment of 80 subpopulations of seven AMM species to vessel traffic during the ice-free season. Vulnerability scores were based on the combined influence of spatially explicit exposure to the sea routes and a suite of sensitivity variables. More than half of AMM subpopulations (42/80) are exposed to open-water vessel transits in the Arctic sea routes. Narwhals (Monodon monoceros) were estimated to be most vulnerable to vessel impacts, given their high exposure and sensitivity, and polar bears (Ursus maritimus) were estimated to be the least vulnerable because of their low exposure and sensitivity. Regions with geographic bottlenecks, such as the Bering Strait and eastern Canadian Arctic, were characterized by two to three times higher vulnerability than more remote regions. These pinch points are obligatory pathways for both vessels and migratory AMMs, and so represent potentially high conflict areas but also opportunities for conservation-informed planning. Some of the species and regions identified as least vulnerable were also characterized by high uncertainty, highlighting additional data and monitoring needs. Our quantification of the heterogeneity of risk across AMM species provides a necessary first step toward developing best practices for maritime industries poised to advance into this rapidly changing seascape.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 341 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 73 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 19%
Researcher 14 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 18%
Student > Master 12 16%
Other 7 10%
Other 13 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 24 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 33%
Unspecified 10 14%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 8%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Other 6 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 496. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2019.
All research outputs
#15,421
of 12,986,305 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#478
of 79,125 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#843
of 268,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#20
of 962 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,986,305 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,125 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,565 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 962 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.