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In Situ Formation of N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bound Single-Molecule Junctions

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the American Chemical Society, July 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
In Situ Formation of N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bound Single-Molecule Junctions
Published in
Journal of the American Chemical Society, July 2018
DOI 10.1021/jacs.8b05184
Pubmed ID
Authors

Evan A. Doud, Michael S. Inkpen, Giacomo Lovat, Enrique Montes, Daniel W. Paley, Michael L. Steigerwald, Héctor Vázquez, Latha Venkataraman, Xavier Roy

Abstract

Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed using N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) have recently emerged as thermally and chemically ultrastable alternatives to those formed from thiols. The rich chemistry and strong σ-donating ability of NHCs offer unique prospects for applications in nanoelectronics, sensing, and electrochemistry. Although stable in SAMs, free carbenes are notoriously reactive, making their electronic characterization challenging. Here we report the first investigation of electron transport across single NHC-bound molecules using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break junction (STM-BJ) technique. We develop a series of air-stable metal NHC complexes that can be electrochemically reduced in situ to form NHC-electrode contacts, enabling reliable single-molecule conductance measurements of NHCs under ambient conditions. Using this approach, we show that the conductance of an NHC depends on the identity of the single metal atom to which it is coordinated in the junction. Our observations are supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which also firmly establish the contributions of the NHC linker to the junction transport characteristics. Our work demonstrates a powerful method to probe electron transfer across NHC-electrode interfaces; more generally, it opens the door to the exploitation of surface-bound NHCs in constructing novel, functionalized electrodes and/or nanoelectronic devices.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 11 26%
Researcher 9 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 19%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 19 45%
Unspecified 12 29%
Physics and Astronomy 7 17%
Materials Science 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2018.
All research outputs
#7,076,869
of 13,184,150 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the American Chemical Society
#38,750
of 47,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,574
of 267,794 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the American Chemical Society
#334
of 476 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,184,150 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 47,267 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,794 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 476 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.