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Environmental waters as a source of antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus species in Belgrade, Serbia

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, August 2015
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Title
Environmental waters as a source of antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus species in Belgrade, Serbia
Published in
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, August 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10661-015-4814-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katarina Veljović, Nikola Popović, Amarela Terzić Vidojević, Maja Tolinački, Sanja Mihajlović, Branko Jovčić, Milan Kojić

Abstract

Despite the number of studies on antibiotic-resistant enterococci from Serbian clinical settings, there are no data about environmental contamination with these bacteria. Thus, this study investigated the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant enterococci in Belgrade, Serbia. Enterococcus species collected from ten surface water sites, including a lake, two major river systems, and springs, were tested. Among enterococci, we found single (21.7 %), double (17.4 %), and multiple antibiotic resistance patterns (56.3 %). Vancomycin-resistant strains were not found, indicating that their abundance in Belgrade is tightly linked to clinical settings. The multiple drug-resistant strains Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, and Enterococcus mundtii were frequently detected in the lake during the swimming season and in the rivers near industrial zones. We confirmed the presence of ermB, ermC, ant(6)-Ia, tetM, and tetL and mutations in gyrA genes. The phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene of E. faecium isolates that harbor esp gene classified them into two groups based on high-bootstraps scores in the tree analysis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of antibiotic-resistant enterococci revealed genomic similarity ranging from 75 to 100 %. This study indicates the importance of anthropogenic impact to the spread of antibiotic-resistant enterococci in environmental waters of Belgrade, Serbia.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 16%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 15 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 19 42%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 September 2015.
All research outputs
#19,382,126
of 23,854,458 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
#1,865
of 2,748 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#197,894
of 271,296 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
#24
of 43 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.