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A sexual health quality improvement program (SHIMMER) triples chlamydia and gonorrhoea testing rates among young people attending Aboriginal primary health care services in Australia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
13 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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45 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
A sexual health quality improvement program (SHIMMER) triples chlamydia and gonorrhoea testing rates among young people attending Aboriginal primary health care services in Australia
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1107-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simon Graham, Rebecca J. Guy, Handan C. Wand, John M. Kaldor, Basil Donovan, Janet Knox, Debbie McCowen, Patricia Bullen, Julie Booker, Chris O’Brien, Kristine Garrett, James S. Ward

Abstract

In Australia, chlamydia is the most commonly notifiable infection and over the past ten years chlamydia and gonorrhoea notification rates have increased. Aboriginal compared with non-Aboriginal Australians have the highest notifications rates of chlamydia and gonorrhoea. Regular testing of young people for chlamydia and gonorrhoea is a key prevention strategy to identify asymptomatic infections early, provide treatment and safe sex education. This study evaluated if a sexual health quality improvement program (QIP) known as SHIMMER could increase chlamydia and gonorrhoea testing among young people attending four Aboriginal primary health care services in regional areas of New South Wales, Australia. We calculated the proportion of 15-29 year olds tested and tested positivity for chlamydia and gonorrhoea in a 12-month before period (March 2010-February 2011) compared with a 12-month QIP period (March 2012-February 2013). Logistic regression was used to assess the difference in the proportion tested for chlamydia and gonorrhoea between study periods by gender, age group, Aboriginal status and Aboriginal primary health service. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with significance at p < 0.05. In the before period, 9 % of the 1881 individuals were tested for chlamydia, compared to 22 % of the 2259 individuals in the QIP period (OR): 1.43, 95 % CI: 1.22-1.67). From the before period to the QIP period, increases were observed in females (13 % to 25 %, OR: 1.32, 95 % CI: 1.10-1.59) and males (3 % to 17 %, OR: 1.85, 95 % CI: 1.36-2.52). The highest testing rate in the QIP period was in 15-19 year old females (16 % to 29 %, OR: 1.02, 95 % CI: 0.75-1.37), yet the greatest increase was in 20-24 year olds males (3 % to 19 %, OR: 1.65, 95 % CI: 1.01-2.69). Similar increases were seen in gonorrhoea testing. Overall, there were 70 (11 %) chlamydia diagnoses, increasing from 24 in the before to 46 in the QIP period. Overall, 4 (0.7 %) gonorrhoea tests were positive. The QIP used in SHIMMER almost tripled chlamydia and gonorrhoea testing in young people and found more than twice as many chlamydia infections. The QIP could be used by other primary health care centres to increase testing among young people.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 27%
Student > Bachelor 9 20%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Lecturer 3 7%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 8 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 16%
Social Sciences 4 9%
Psychology 3 7%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 13 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2016.
All research outputs
#2,441,801
of 18,710,012 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#759
of 6,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,931
of 247,915 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,710,012 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,526 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,915 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them