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Incorporating anthropogenic effects into trophic ecology: predator–prey interactions in a human-dominated landscape

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
51 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
425 Mendeley
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Title
Incorporating anthropogenic effects into trophic ecology: predator–prey interactions in a human-dominated landscape
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2015
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2015.1602
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ine Dorresteijn, Jannik Schultner, Dale G. Nimmo, Joern Fischer, Jan Hanspach, Tobias Kuemmerle, Laura Kehoe, Euan G. Ritchie

Abstract

Apex predators perform important functions that regulate ecosystems worldwide. However, little is known about how ecosystem regulation by predators is influenced by human activities. In particular, how important are top-down effects of predators relative to direct and indirect human-mediated bottom-up and top-down processes? Combining data on species' occurrence from camera traps and hunting records, we aimed to quantify the relative effects of top-down and bottom-up processes in shaping predator and prey distributions in a human-dominated landscape in Transylvania, Romania. By global standards this system is diverse, including apex predators (brown bear and wolf), mesopredators (red fox) and large herbivores (roe and red deer). Humans and free-ranging dogs represent additional predators in the system. Using structural equation modelling, we found that apex predators suppress lower trophic levels, especially herbivores. However, direct and indirect top-down effects of humans affected the ecosystem more strongly, influencing species at all trophic levels. Our study highlights the need to explicitly embed humans and their influences within trophic cascade theory. This will greatly expand our understanding of species interactions in human-modified landscapes, which compose the majority of the Earth's terrestrial surface.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 51 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 425 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 5 1%
Brazil 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Bulgaria 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Other 6 1%
Unknown 404 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 98 23%
Student > Master 88 21%
Researcher 61 14%
Student > Bachelor 56 13%
Other 23 5%
Other 63 15%
Unknown 36 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 219 52%
Environmental Science 118 28%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 1%
Social Sciences 4 <1%
Arts and Humanities 4 <1%
Other 14 3%
Unknown 60 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 110. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2019.
All research outputs
#156,226
of 14,145,010 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#463
of 7,772 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,491
of 239,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#14
of 156 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,145,010 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,772 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 239,515 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 156 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.