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Evaluating multisite multiprofessional simulation training for a hyperacute stroke service using the Behaviour Change Wheel

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)

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13 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

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52 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluating multisite multiprofessional simulation training for a hyperacute stroke service using the Behaviour Change Wheel
Published in
BMC Medical Education, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12909-015-0423-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

AJ Ross, GB Reedy, A. Roots, P. Jaye, J. Birns

Abstract

Stroke is a clinical priority requiring early specialist assessment and treatment. A London (UK) stroke strategy was introduced in 2010, with Hyper Acute Stroke Units (HASUs) providing specialist and high dependency care. To support increased numbers of specialist staff, innovative multisite multiprofessional simulation training under a standard protocol-based curriculum took place across London. This paper reports on an independent evaluation of the HASU training programme. The main aim was to evaluate mechanisms for behaviour change within the training design and delivery, and impact upon learners including potential transferability to the clinical environment. The evaluation utilised the Behaviour Change Wheel framework. Procedures included: mapping training via the framework; examination of course material; direct and video-recorded observations of courses; pre-post course survey sheet; and follow up in-depth interviews with candidates and faculty. Patient management skills and trainee confidence were reportedly increased post-course (post-course median 6 [IQ range 5-6.33]; pre-course median 5 [IQ range 4.67-5.83]; z = 6.42, P < .001). Thematic analysis showed that facilitated 'debrief' was the key agent in supporting both clinical and non-clinical skills. Follow up interviews in practice showed some sustained effects such as enthusiasm for role, and a focus on situational awareness, prioritization and verbalising thoughts. Challenges in standardising a multi-centre course included provision for local context/identity. Pan-London simulation training under the London Stroke Model had positive outcomes in terms of self-reported skills and motivation. These effects persisted to an extent in practice, where staff could recount applications of learning. The evaluation demonstrated that a multiple centre simulation programme congruent with clinical practice can provide valuable standard training opportunities that support patient care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 19%
Researcher 7 13%
Other 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Other 15 29%
Unknown 9 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Social Sciences 6 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Psychology 4 8%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 12 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 November 2015.
All research outputs
#2,252,852
of 15,289,877 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#384
of 2,186 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,473
of 240,596 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,289,877 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,186 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,596 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them